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Walther Wolff, Ehrenplakette Hindenburg

Walther Wolff, Ehrenplakette Hindenburg Walther Wolff, Ehrenplakette Hindenburg Walther Wolff, Ehrenplakette Hindenburg

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Price:€ 1000.00

Description

‘Ehrenplakette Hindenburg’ ('Hindenburg, Plague of Honour')
Signed ‘W Wolff’, 35’.
At the back 'Gesetzlich Geschützt' ('Protected by Law'), and 'LH' ('Lauchhammer').

The text on the relief reads: ‘Nimmer wird das Reich vergeben, wenn ihr einig seid und treu’: '
Never will the empire be destroyed, if we are united and loyal’.
The phrase is based on the last two lines of the patriotic poem ‘Frühlingsgruss an das Vaterland’ (‘Spring greetings to the Fatherland’) by German poet Max von Schinkendorf (1783 – 1817) written during the War of Liberation. In the War of Liberation (1813 - 1814), a coalition of Austria, Prussia, Russia, the United Kingdom, Portugal, Sweden, Spain and a number of German states finally defeated France and drove Napoleon into exile on Elba.


The Walther Wolff-plagues: Hindenburg (1935), Hitler (1933) and Göring (1935)
These Walther Wolff-designed casts were produced with slight variations by several firms. The qualitative best casts were produced by Lauchhammer: at the back they have the text ‘Ges. Gesch' ('Gesetzlich Geschützt' meaning 'Protected by Law'), and 'LH' ('Lauchhammer’).
The Hitler-relief by Wolff was instituted as the official iron portrait and installed in public spaces, schools and official institutions throughout Nazi Germany; it was also sold commercially to Nazi citizens and private companies.
Wolff’s famous reliefs were made by the hundreds, but after 1945 they were also destructed just as abundantly.
      


Walther Wolff, ‘Ehrenplakette Hindenburg’. Signed ’W. Wolff 35’. Size 32 x 22 cm. Iron-cast. Black patina. At the back 'Gesetzlich Geschützt' and 'LH'.
The text on the relief reads: ‘Nimmer wird das Reich vergeben, wenn ihr einig seid und treu’: ‘Never will the empire be destroyed, if we are united and loyal’.


Walther Wolff, ‘Ehrenplakette Hitler’. Signed ’W. Wolff 33’. Size 32 x 22 cm. Iron-cast. Black patina. At the back 'Gesetzlich Geschützt' and 'LH'.
The text on the relief reads: ‘Ich glaube an deutschland und kämpfe dafür heute und morgen und in der zukunft bis unser der sieg ist’: ‘I believe in Germany and fighting for it today, tomorrow and in the future until our victory is done’.
The Hitler-relief (also for sale) is less rare then the Hindenburg- and Göring-relief.


Walther Wolff, ‘Ehrenplakette Göring’. Signed ’W. Wolff 35’. Size 32 x 22 cm. Iron-cast. Black patina. At the back 'Gesetzlich Geschützt' and 'LH'.
The text on the relief reads: ‘Das deutsche Volk muss ein Volk von Fliegern werden‘: 'The German people must be a people of aviators’.
 

Advertisement of the Hitler- and Göring reliefs in 'Kunst im Dritten Reich', September 1938; 'Entworfen von Bildhauer Wolff', meaning 'Designed by sculptor Wolff'.
   


Left: doubled-sided display leaflet depicting the ‘Ehrenplakette des Führers’ on one side, and Nazi propaganda on the back. The front page contains a photographic facsimile of the famous plaque of Hitler created by Walther Wolff in 1933.
Right: the Hitler-relief by Wolff depicted on a postcard.
  

Backside of the Hindenburg-relief by Wolff: 'Gesetzlich Geschützt' and 'Lauchhammer'.
    





NIMMER WIRD DAS REICH VERGEBEN, WENN IHR EINIG SEID UND TREU:

Campain-poster of the NSDAP for the Reichstagswahl at 5 March, 1933 (in the possession of the German Historical Museum). The text reads: ‘Nimmer wird das Reich zerstöret, wenn ihr einig seid und treu’: ‘Never will the empire be destroyed, if we are united and loyal’.



The ‘Kaiser Wilhelm I Monument‘ (‘The Emperor Wihelm I Memorial‘) in Koblenz, Deutsche Eck (‘German Corner‘, at the confluence of the Moselle river with the Rhine). Height in total 44 meters. On August 31 1897, the copper-driven monument of Emperor Wilhelm I was inaugurated in the presence of Kaiser Wilhelm II. It was designed as a monument to the German Reich founded in  1871. The base of the statue, damaged in the Second World War, served from 1953-1990 as a memorial of the German Unity. A replica of the sculpture group was installed back on the pedestal in 1993 after previous controversial discussions. Since 2002 the monument is part of the UNESCO World Heritage ‘Upper Middle Rhine Valley‘. The text at the monument reads: ‘Nimmer wird das Reich zerstöret, wenn ihr einig seid und treu‘.  





‘Nimmer wird das Reich zerstöret, wenn ihr einig seid und treu‘. Medal against the Treaty of Versailles. Bronze, issued in 1919. Design: Mayer and Wilhelm, Stuttgart. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum.



This postcard stamped 23 March 1930 refers to the end of the French occupation of the Rheinland (1 December 1918- 39 June 1930).
Left, below the text: ‘Nimmer wird das Reich zerstöret, wenn ihr einig seid und treu‘. 
In the middle, on top the text: ‘Deutsch ist der Rhein, Deutsch soll er sein‘ (‘The river Rhine is German, and will remain German’).
 



 

- condition : II       
- size : 32 x 22 cm
- signed : in the neck 'W Wolff 35'
- type : cast iron. Black patina
- misc. : professional cleaned and treated with a preserve

 


Left: Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of President von Hindenburg’. Postcard.
Right: Walther Wolff, ‘Reichsorganisationsleiter Dr. Ley’, GDK 1939, room 2. Depicted in the official GDK-catalogue of 1939. 
  


Left: Walther Wolff, ’Bust of Alfred Cortot’, bronze, 1937. Depicted in ‘Deutsche Plastik der Gegenwart’, Rembrandt Verlag, 1940.
Alfred Denis Cortot (1877–1962) was a Swiss-French pianist and conductor. He is one of the most renowned 20th-century classical musicians, especially valued for his poetic insight into Romantic-period piano works, particularly those of Chopin and Schumann. Controversially, he did not openly oppose the German occupation of France during the Second World War. He was a member of the Conseil National (‘National Council’), a non-elective consultative body of the Vichy government, which included a number of former members of the French parliament and non-political celebrities. Cortot played in Nazi-sponsored concerts in Germany, and served as Vichy's High Commissioner of the Fine Arts. His Vichy connections led to him being declared persona non grata after 1945.
Right: Walther Wolff, ‘Professor M. Planck’, created 1939. GDK 1939, room 35. Bust of Professor Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck, the German theoretical physicist whose work on quantum theory won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918. The Planck bust by Walther Wolff (height 40 cm) was handed over to the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin by the Max Planck Society on the occasion of the 100th birthday celebrations of the physicist in 1958. The bust was on display in 2010 in the Magnus-Haus, Berlin. Also depicted in 'Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1939.
  


Walther Wolff, ‘Husaren-denkmal’ (‘Hussar-memorial’), 1929, Krefeld.  Commissioned by the ‘Offiziersvereinigung des Regiments’ in Krefeld.
  


Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of Hermann Göring’, created 1936. Height 50 cm including base, weight 14 kg. Foundry ‘Guss Sperlich’. Signed ‘Walther Wolff  Berlin’.  Depicted in 'Die Kunst im Dritten Reich', 1938.
A similar bust of Göring is in the possession of the RAF Museum Henden, Londen (Battle of Britain Hangar).
  



Left: Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of Paul Graener’ (1872–1944), German composer and conductor.
Displayed at the GDK 1937, room 23, and at the 'Frühjahrs-Ausstellung', 1940, Preussische Akademie der Künste'. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Dritten/ Deutschen Reich’, 1937 and in 1943.
Right: the plaster model of Graener by Wollf, depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasing's', Monatshefte, 1938.
  


Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of Wilhelm Furtwängler’. This bust of the famous composer Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886–1954), created by Wolff in 1941, is in the possession of the town theatre in Lübeck. The bust, remembering Wilhelm Furhtwängler’s contribution as chef-conductor in Lübeck from 1911 to 1915, was donated to the city of Lübeck in 2006 by the grandson of Walther Wolff.
   


Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of Walther Gieseking’, 1941. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im deutschen Reich’, 1943. Displayed at the 'Herbstausstellung Verein Berliner Künstler', 1938. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.
Walther Wilhelm Gieseking (1895 - 1956) was a French-born German pianist and composer.



Ich Hatt‘ einen Kameraden
‘Ich hatt’ einen Kameraden’ (‘I had a Comrade’) is a traditional lament of the German Armed Forces. The text was written by German poet Ludwig Uhland in 1809. Its immediate inspiration was the deployment of Badener troops against the Tyrolean Rebellion. In 1825, the composer Friedrich Silcher set it to music, based on the tune of a Swiss folk song.  The song is about the immediate experience of a soldier losing a comrade in battle, detached from all political or national ideology; as a result, its use was never limited to one particular faction and was sung or cited by representatives of all political backgrounds throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, and was translated for use in numerous fighting forces, French, Dutch, Spanish, Japanese and others. ‘I had a Comrade’ still plays an important ceremonial role in the German Armed Forces and is an integral part of a military funeral, continuing a tradition started at some point around 1871. The song is often played on Volkstrauertag, the German Remembrance Day, at memorials for the fallen. To some degree it is also used in the French Army.

Walther Wolff, ‘World War I Memorial at the graveyard Bergfriedhof-Halsbrech‘, city of Stolberg. Revealed in 1932. The sculpture was commissioned by the industrialist Dr. Franz Wirtz, in his testament after his death in 1930. The base bears the inscription: ‘Ich hatt’ einen Kameraden’. Photo taken in 2018.



Left: Walther Wolff, ‘Bust op Adolf Hitler’. Weighing almost 14 kg, 1.5 times life size, 35 cm high excluding base. Signed ‘W. Wolff .33’.  Foundry ‘Guss M. Sperlich Berlin’.
Right: Walther Wolff, ‘Bust of Adolf Hitler’, depicted on the cover of the book ‘Adolf Hitler, Symbol der deutschen Nation’, 1941.
  


Walther Wolff, ‘Kärnter Mädel‘ (‘Girl from Carinthia’), 1940, height 38 cm. Displayed at the exhibition ‘100 Jahre Verein Berliner Künstler‘, Berlin, May/June 1941. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.







Walther Wolff, sculptor of busts of Nazi leaders, top musicians and leading scientists
Walther Wolff (1887–1966), born in Wuppertal, first studied architecture in Munich. Then he went to the Munich Art Academy were he initially studied paintings and drawing under H. Groeber and Habermann. Next he attended the sculpture courses of Balthasar Schmidt at the same institution. He completed his studies at the Berlin Art Academy, where he was a student of Georg Kolbe (1912–1914) and a Meisterschüler of Louis Tuaillon. In 1905 he became a member of the Bergische Kunstgenossenschaft in Wupperteil (an art association that still exists). After he made some study trips to France and Italy, he moved to Cologne in 1918. Two years later he settled in Berlin where he stayed almost two decennia, until he moved to Ossiach, Austria.  
In 1929 his ‘Husaren-denkmal’ (‘Hussar-memorial’) in Krefeld was revealed: a war memorial commissioned by the local ‘Offiziersvereinigung des Regiments’. In 1932 Walther Wolff created ‘Mourning Young Man’, a war memorial at the graveyard Bergfriedhof-Halsbrech in Stolberg near Achen. The sculpture was commissioned by the industrialist Dr. Franz Wirtz, in his testament after his death in 1930, and bears the inscription: ‘Ich hatt einen Kameraden’ (‘I had a Comrade’), the famous text of German poet Ludwig Uhland, written in 1809. Wolff also executed various works for the buildings of the Deutsche Bank in Berlin and Wuppertal. 
Walther Wolff’s specialty, however, became portrait busts of political leaders, top musicians and leading scientists. Among them Hitler, Hindenburg, Hermann Göring, pianist Alfred Cortot, theoretical physicist and Nobel prize winner Max Planck, composer and conductor Paul Graener, composer Wilhelm Fuhrtwängler and pianist and composer Walther Gieseking.
In 1933 he became famous when he created the ‘Ehren-plakette des Führers’ (‘Honour Plaque of the Führer’). This iron relief measuring 32 x 21,5 cm, a commissioned work, depicted the head of Hitler with the text below: ‘Ich glaube an deutschland und kämpfe dafür heute und morgen und in derzukunft bis unser der sieg ist' ('I believe in Germany and fighting for it today, tomorrow and in the future until our victory is done'). This was instituted as the official iron portrait and was installed in public spaces, schools and official institutions throughout Nazi Germany; it was also sold commercially to companies and Nazi citizens. Wolff’s famous reliefs were made by the hundreds, but after 1945 they were also destructed just as abundantly. 
Walther Wolff displayed his works at all the major Berlin exhibitions; at the Preussische Akademie der Künste (i.a. 'Frühjahrs-Ausstellung', 1940 and 1941), 'Herbst-Ausstellung', 1941 and 1942); at the exhibitions organised by the 'Verein Berliner Künstler' (i.a. 'Herbstausstellung', 1938, 1939, 1940 and 1941), and at the 'Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung', i.a. 1942). In 1941 Wolff took part in the exhibition '100 Jahre Verein Berliner Künstler', Berlin.
At the GDK Wolff was represented with five busts: ‘Professor Dr. h.c. Paul Graener’ (GDK 1937 room 23), ‘Professor M. Planck’ (GDK 1939, room 35), ‘Reichsorganisationsleiter Dr. Ley’ (GDK 1939, room 2), ‘Viktor Lutze d.J.’ (GDK 1942, room 30) and town councillor dr. O.B. (GDK 1943, room 33).
The 1939-GDK bust of Professor Max Planck (the German theoretical physicist whose work on quantum theory won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918) was handed over to the German Academy of Sciences in Berlin by the Max Planck Society on the occasion of the 100th birthday celebrations of the physicist in 1958. The bust was on display in 2010 in the Magnus-Haus, Berlin.
Walther Wolff died in 1966 at the age of 79 in Ossiach, Austria.
A bust of Hermann Göring, created by Wolff in 1936, is in the possession of the RAF Museum Henden, Londen (Battle of Britain Hangar).
A bust of the famous composer Wilhelm Furtwängler (1886–1954), created by Wolff in 1941, is in the possession of the town theatre in Lübeck. The bust, remembering Wilhelm Furhtwängler’s contribution as chef-conductor in Lübeck from 1911 to 1915, was donated to the city of Lübeck in 2006 by the grandson of Walther Wolff.