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Paul Mathias Padua, Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung

Paul Mathias Padua, Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung Paul Mathias Padua, Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung

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'Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung' ('Tiroler City Counsel Meeting')

'Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung’ by Paul Matias Padua. Depicted in the magazine 'Jugend', 1937, number 33. Again depicted in ‘Jugend’, 1938, number 27; a special about the ‘Tag der Deutschen Kunst 1938’ (the 'Day of German Art', 1938). 
Also depicted in Velhagen & Klasings, Monatshefte, Juni 1938, and August 1940.

Left: 'Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzung', depicted in Velhagen & Klasings, Monatshefte, August 1940.
Right: 'Tiroler Gemeinderatssitzing', depicted in 'Jugend', 1938, number 27.
    

- condition : II                   
- size : 238 x 167 cm, excluding frame
- signed : right, under. Dated 1936 
- type : oil on canvas                            








 


Left: Paul Matias Padua, 'Der Führer Spricht'. Depicted in 'Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1940. GDK 1940, room 15. Also displayed under the name ‘Le Führer parle' at the exhibition ‘Le IIIe Reich et la Musique’ in the Musée de la Musique, Paris, October 2004 – January 2005.
Right: Joseph Goebels visiting the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung 1942. Next to Goebbels on his right Gerdy Troost, Rudolf Hess and Prof. Karl Kolb, director of the Haus der Deutschen Kunst. ‘Der Führer Spricht’ at the background, left (photo: Österreichische Nationalbibliothek).
  

Paul Mathias Padua, 1941, in conversation with his neighbour, the man who stood model in 'Der Führer Spricht'.



Left: Paul Mathias Padua in uniform -still wounded- at the GDK, July 1941. At the right his wife, the actress Ingeborg Wittmann; at the back Prof. Karl Kolbe, Director of the Haus der deutschen Kunst.  A few minutes before, Padua had a conversation with Rudolf Hess and Joseph Goebbels (photo on request).
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, postcard, 'Der 10. May 1940'. GDK 1941, room 1. The 10th of May 1940 celebrates the German’s opening of the western offenses. The leader of the 15 men crossing the Rhine (to the French side) was depicted as someone who was beckoning the whole nation to follow him with an almost religious gesture; he was the leader, but also their comrade. Padua, engaged as a war artist as a part of the Propagandakompagnie, was wounded when he was painting this scene. Later he finished the painting in his atelier in Munich.
      


Three times Benito Mussolini..
Paul Mathias Padua portrayed Benito Mussolini three times, he told Der Spiegel in an interview in 1965 (i.a. in 1937 and in 1945). In February 1945 Italian dictator Benito Mussolini sat for a Padua portrait. ‘When I finished the picture of Il Duce he looked long and hard at it, then at me. He told me it was the best portrait if himself he’d ever seen, but that he was afraid it was also his last… He was killed two months later’, Padua said in an interview with the ‘La Crosse Tribune’ (Wisconsin), on 3 October 1965.
Left: Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Portrait of Benito Mussolini’, created during the state visit to Germany of Mussolini from 25 to 29 September 1937.
Mid: Mussolini visiting the atelier of Paul Mathias Padua in 1937.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Portrait of Benito Mussolini’, signed right-under ‘1945’. Size: 83 x 60 cm. Sold in 2004 by a German auction house (foto's: Bayerische StaatsBibliothek). 
     


Left: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Generaloberst von Reichenau' ('Colonel General von Reichenau'). Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings', Monatshefte, 1940.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Schlafende Diana' ('Sleeping Diana'). Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings', Monatshefte, 1940.
  


Paul Mathias Padua. 'Leda mit dem Schwan'. GDK 1939, room 22. The painting 'Leda and the Swan' created quite a scandal when it was exhibited in the GDK 1939 because of its salaciousness. Gauleiter and Minster Adolf Wagner strongly disapproved of the painting and Padua feared being sent to a concentration camp. However, his painting was bought by Hitler himself -for his spare bedroom- for 5.000 Reichsmark; Padua became famous and lived until 1981. As model, Padua bought for 25 Reichsmark a large swan from the Munich zoo. Later, at 3 October 1965, Padua wrote in the newspaper ‘La Cosse Tribune’ (Wisconsin): ‘The Americans conficated it (the painting) when they took the Obersalzberg retreat. I heard later that the it had been auctioned off and have no idea tot his day who has it’.



Paul Mathias Padua and a version of 'Leda mit dem Schwan', shown on German television on 7 September, 1965.
The picture is from the documentary ‘Die Zeit unter der Lupe 815/1965‘ (at 2.55).



Left: Paul Matias Padua, ‘Flammenwerfer’ (’Flamethrower‘). GDK 1941, room 1.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Muschelfischer' ('Shellfischer'). Displayed at the 'Münchener Kunstausstellung', 1939, Maximilianeum.
  


Left: Paul Matias Padua, ‘Der Panzerführer’ (‘Tank Commander‘). Displayed at the exhibition ‘Maler an der Front’ (‘Painters at the Front’), organized by the ‘Oberkommando des Heeres‘ (Supreme High Command of the German Army) in combination with the ‘Hauptstelle Bildende Kunst in der Dienstelle des Reichsleiters Rosenberg’ (‘Amt Rosenberg‘) and the ‘Reichsminsterium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda‘, April 1941, Berlin. Also depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘, 1941, and in 'Die Kunst im Dritten Reich', 1976, by Reinhard Müller Mehlis.
Right: Paul Matias Padua, creating 'Der Panzerführer‘ (photo: Bayerische StaatsBibliothek).
    


Alfred Rosenberg (in the middle) at the exhibition 'Maler an der Front', 1941. At the left 'Der Panzerführer' by Padua.




Paul Mathias Padua, 'Prinz Eugen nach einer Schlacht' ('Prinz Eugen after a Battle'). Wall painting in the Officers' Mess of an Airbase. Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings', Monatshefte, 1940.
  


Paul Mathias Padua, 'Der Urlauber' ('On Holiday'), created in 1944. Displayed at the exhibition 'Deutsche Künsler und die SS', Salzburg, 1944. Size 194 x 154 cm. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum.
This painting was also displayed at the exhibition ‘Artige Kunst, Kunst und Politik im Nationalsozialismus‘ (‘Compliant Art, Art and Politics in the National Socialist era’) held at Museum Situation Kunst, Bochum (November 2016 – April 2017), Kunsthalle Rostock, Rostock (April – June 2017) and at Kunstforum Ostdeutsche Galerie, Regensburg (July –  October 2017); photo below. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.



Paul Mathias Padua, 'Fischer in der Adria' ('Fisher in the Adriatic Sea'). Displayed at the Münchener Kunstausstellung 1940, Maximilianeum.
  


Left: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Bauern beim Bier' ('Farmers drinking beer'). Depicted in Westermann Monatshefte, 1935.
Right: 'Bauern beim Bier', showed on German televison on 7 September 1965,
  


Left: Paul Matias Padua, ‘Dorfmeier und Keiler’ (‘Mayor and Merchant’). Displayed at the Grosse Münchener Kunstausttellung in the Glaspalast, 1924.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Zwei Bauern' ('Two Peasants'). Created in 1933. Sold by a German auction house in 2014. Size 56 x 49 cm.
  


Left: Paul Matias Padua, ‘Junges Paar’ (‘Young Couple’). Displayed at the the Grosse Münchener Kunstausttellung in the Glaspalast, 1927. Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings', Monatshefte, 1930/31. 
Right: 'Junges Paar', showed on German television on 7 September 1965.  
   


Paul Mathias Padua, 'Zwei niederbayerische Bauern' ('Two Bavarian Peasants'). Postcard. Date of creation unknown.
Paul Mathias Padua, 'Die Südtiroler' ('Peasants of South Tyrol'). Postcard. Date of creation unknown.
  


Left: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Im Gespräch' ('Conversation'). Depicted in 'Das Bild', May 1935, as well as in 'Das bäuerliche Jahr, Ein Buch vom Bauerntum in Bildern deutscher Maler', 1939.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Zwei Zarntaler Bauern' ('Two peasants from South Tyrol'). Depicted in 'Das Bild', May 1935.
  


Left: Paul Mathias Padua, 'Die Wildschützen' ('The Poachers'). Created in 1929. Sold by a German auction house in 2014. Size 86 x 70 cm. The artist has possibly depicted himself in the middle.
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, cut-out of 'Die Wildschützen'. Depicted in 'Das Bild', October 1935.  
  



Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Der Trommler’ (‘The Drummer’). GDK 1944 room 22. Bought by the Mitteldeutsche Landesbank, Halle, for 12.000 Reichsmark. Displayed at the permanent exhibition ‘Moderne Eins, 1900-1945’ of the Kunstmuseum Moritzburg, Halle, 2017.



Left: Archbishop Makarios III, president of Cypres, poses while his portrait is painted by Paul Mathias Padua. Depicted in the ‘La Crosse Tribune’ (Wisconsin), 3 October 1965.
Right: the portrait of Makarios III by Padua shown on German television on 7 September 1965. 
  


Shown on German television on 7 September 1965:
Left: Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Richard Strauss’ (Richard Georg Strauss, 1864 – 1949, leading German composer and conductor).
Middle: Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Gerhart Hauptmann’ (Gerhart Johann Robert Hauptmann, 1862 – 1946, German dramatist and novelist who received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1912).
Right: Paul Mathias Padua, ‘Herbert von Karajan’ (Herbert von Karajan, 1908 -  1989), principal conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic for 35 years, generally regarded as one of the greatest conductors of the 20th century. Dominant figure in European classical music from the mid-1950s until his death.
     


Detroit free Press (Michigan), 25 August 1981: ; ‘painter who created -Der Führer Speaks- died..’



New York Times, August 26, 1981: 'Paul Padua, Artist, Is Dead. Known for Portrait of Hitler'.





Paul Mathas Padua, shown on German television on 7 September, 1965.






 

Paul Mathias Padua
Paul Mathias Padua (1903–1981) was a German painter who grew up in poor circumstances with his grandparents in Bavaria. When he was 15 years old he voluntarily joined the military during World War I. Later, he left the Art Academy already after eight days to focus on his artistic interests. He was largely self-taught, basing his studies on the work of Wilhelm Leibl and the artists of Leibl’s circle. Padua concentrated on traditional painting: portraits, still life’s, landscapes and flower bunches. He joined the Munich Artists’ Association in 1922, and in the same year he exhibited for the first time at the Munich Glaspalast Numerous Glaspalast-exhibitions would follow, as well as prestigious prizes: the ‘Georg Schicht Preis’ in 1928, the ‘Albrecht Dürer Preis’ in 1930 and a travel bursary awarded by the City of Munich in 1931. Later in 1937 and 1940, the City of Munich awarded him the Lenbachpreis. His success grew further in the 30s and came to a high point during the Nazi era. He also exhibited in Paris in 1932 and in London in 1935 and 1936. The once poor child now had contacts with important industrial families such as the Flicks, Krupps, Hortens, Siemens, Oetkers as well as with political leaders and kings.
Paul Padua had 27 paintings in the Great German Art Exhibitions. They were bought by Heinrich Himmler (/Hitler), Joachim von Ribbentrop, Joseph Goebbels, Martin Bormann and other nazi institutions for prices of up to 30.000 Reichsmark.
The painting 'Leda and the Swan' created quite a scandal when it was exhibited in the GDK 1939 because of its salaciousness. Gauleiter and Minster Adolf Wagner strongly disapproved of the painting and Padua feared being sent to a concentration camp. However, his painting was bought by Hitler himself -for his spare bedroom- for 5.000 Reichsmark; Padua became famous and lived until 1981. As model, Padua bought for 25 Reichsmark a large swan from the Munich zoo. Later, at 3 October 1965, Padua wrote in the newspaper ‘La Cosse Tribune’ (Wisconsin): ‘The Americans conficated it (the painting) when they took the Obersalzberg retreat. I heard later that the it had been auctioned off and have no idea tot his day who has it’.
Besides the famous 'Leda mit dem Schwan' Padua painted two of the most well-known propaganda pictures of the National Socialists: 'Der Führer Spricht' (‘The Leader Speaks’, GDK 1940, room 15), a work commissioned by the 'Intendant des Reichsrundfunks’, and 'Der 10. May 1940', GDK 1941, room 1. The 10th of May 1940 celebrates the German’s opening of the western offenses. The leader of the 15 men crossing the Rhine (to the French side) was depicted as someone who was beckoning the whole nation to follow him with an almost religious gesture; he was the leader, but also their comrade. Padua, engaged as a war artist as a part of the Propagandakompagnie, was wounded when he was painting this scene. Later he finished the painting in his atelier in Munich.
Paul Mathias Padua painted Benito Mussolini three times, he told Der Spiegel in an interview in 1965 (i.a. in 1937 and in 1945). In February 1945 Italian dictator Benito Mussolini sat for a Padua portrait. ‘When I finished the picture of Il Duce he looked long and hard at it, then at me. He told me it was the best portrait if himself he’d ever seen, but that he was afraid it was also his last… He was killed two months later’, Padua said in an interview with the ‘La Crosse Tribune’ (Wisconsin), on 3 October 1965.
Padua portrayed industrialists Friedrich Flick and Helmut Horten, Archbishop Makarios III, president of Cypres (depicted in the ‘La Crosse Tribune’, Wisconsin, 3 October 1965), Otto Hahn (winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1944), conductor Herbert von Karajan, composer and conductor Richard Strauss, composer Paul Lincke, dramatist and novelist Gerhart Hauptmann and the politicians Josef Ertl and Franz Josef Strauß.
After the war he held a succesfull show at Lilienfeld’s Galeries in New York and in September 1965 he opened an exhibition of his own works in the Munich ‘Galerie Schumacher’, the same gallery were he first cought Hitlers eye.
Paul Matias Padua died in 1981 in Rottach-Egern.
Several newspapers in the USA wrote about the death of Paul Mathias Padua. The New York Times, August 26, 1981: 'Paul padua, Artist, Is Dead. Known for Portrait of Hitler'. The Detroit free Press (Michigan) of 25 August 1981 writes: ‘painter who created -Der Führer Speaks- died..’.