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Paul Ludwig Troost, Stilleben

Paul Ludwig Troost, Stilleben Paul Ludwig Troost, Stilleben Paul Ludwig Troost, Stilleben

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Price:€ 18000.00

Description

'Stilleben' ('Still Life')
Created October 1931. Described in 'Hitlers Architekten' by Timo Nüsslein, 2012, page 240.

'At the Berghof, among the 534 art works located there in 1945, only a couple could be classified as contemporary pieces. These had a special sentimental value, a portrait of Paul Ludwig Troost for example', Jonathan Petropoulos, 'Art as politics in the Third Reich'. 

Paul Ludwig Troost, Still Life, depicted in 'Die Kunst im Dritten Reich', 1937, page 61.



Paul Ludwig Troost, 'Der Erster Baumeister des Führers' ('First Architect of the Führer')

Paul Ludwig Troost and Albert Speer are regarded as the two most influential architects of the Third Reich. Troost, however, was also a painter. He started painting in the 1920s, but most of his serious works -approximately 30 to 40 paintings- were created from 1930 to 1934, the year of his death. Paul Ludwig Troost painted women’s portraits ('Frieda Thiersch', 'Gerdy Troost', 'Maiden with Fruits' etc.) and still lifes. The portraits were mostly half-length depictions with single-coloured backgrounds. His still lifes were realistic, three dimensional depictions of fruit, jars, carafes, and books sitting on a wooden table. His still lifes, characterised by regularity and order, were inspired by the works of Cezanne from 1880 to 1895. Most of the paintings of Troost have been lost. 

- condition : II           
- size : 75 x 63 cm, unframed 60 x 50 cm
- signed : right, under; dated 1931
- type : oil on canvas         




Left: Paul Ludwig Troost, Still Life. Depicted on page 135 of ‘Deutsche Maler der Gegenwart’, 1937. 
Right: Paul Ludwig Troost, ‘Maiden with Fruits’, depicted is the original portrait in 2014. Depicted in black-and-white in 'Die Kunst im Dritten Reich', 1937.
   


During the ceremonies marking the opening of the Haus der Deutschen Kunst at 18 July 1937, Hitler visited the grave of architect Paul Ludwig Troost in the Nordfriedhof (‘Illustrierter Beobachter’, 22 July 1937). The bronze Party's eagle with swastika (Hoheitszeichen) on the gravestone was created by Joseph Wackerle in 1934; Troost and Wackerle had been close friends. 
 


Frieda Thiersch, Hiters Bookbinder
Paul Ludwig Troost, ‘Portrait of Frieda Thiersch‘, 1932. Depicted in ‘Hitlers Architekten‘, Timo Nüsslein, 2012.
Frieda Thiersch (1889-1947) was the daughter of the renowned Munich architect Friedrich von Thiersch (in the shadow of her famous father, she served as a model for a statue of Athena by Franz Drexler, which stands watch on the Maximiliansbrücke in Munich, -revealed in 1906, height 5,6 meters excluding base).
Frieda Thiers was one of the top bookbinders in Europe in the 20th century. In 1930 she received a special rush order from the Vatican for a copy of Missale Romanum, the instructions and prayers for celebrating mass to be used by the Pope. Pope Pius XI sent Thiersch a letter of thanks saying he used the book on a daily basis. The book is presumably in the Vatican archives today. Her earliest known contracts for the Nazis are handmade certificates and binders granting honorary citizenship to the Free State of Bavaria presented on April 20, 1933 to the following dignitaries: Franz Ritter von Epp, Reichspräsident von Hindenburg, and Adolf Hitler. Gerdy Troost, wife of Paul Troost, was a personal friend of Frieda and she suggested her for a commission to make a certificate and award for Benito Mussolini during his visit to Munich. The red leather cover of the book commemorating Mussolini’s visit features an embossed eagle with gold leaf accents. Frieda’s design led to the creation of the special Knight’s Cross Eagle, which was used for the first time in 1937, and became a standard Nazi award insignia thereafter. When Hitler wanted to offer his special friends elaborate certificates with leather-bound box enclosures, again on Gerdy Troost’s recommendation, the Führer personally commissioned Frieda Thiersch. In the same year she bound the text to Hitler’s opening speech for the House of German Art 1937. She also handcrafted Hitler’s signature leather books, such as his personal guest book at the Braunes Haus in Munich. Thiers made certificates and the cassette to grant Hermann Goering the Großkreuz, and she was also commissioned to bind ‘Works of German Genius’ for Hitler's private library at Obersalzburg. 


Paul Ludwig Troost with Hitler before a model of the Haus der Deutsche Kunst. Location: the atelier of Troost in Münich, beginning of August 1933. Notice the portrait of Frieda Thiers at the background.
Left from Hitler: Paul Ludwig Troost. Right from Hitler: Gauleiter Adolf Wagner.
The pictures come frome the follwong movie: 'Art in the Third Reich', part II (at 7. 58).
  
   

Left: Around 1933. Heinrich Hoffmann photo depicting Paul Ludwig Troost with Hitler standing next to him; both are looking down at a model column on the table.
Right: Paul Ludwig Troost, ‘Bildnis Gerdy Troost’, depicted on page 135 of ‘Deutsche Maler der Gegenwart’, 1937, and on page 59 of 'Die Kunst im Dritten reich', 1937. A photo of the original painting is in the possession of the Library of Congress, Washington D.C. 
  


Paul Ludwig Troost in the Führermuseum
The Führermuseum, or ‘Linz art gallery’, was an unrealized art museum planned by Adolf Hitler for his hometown, the Austrian city of Linz, near his birthplace of Braunau. Its purpose was to display a selection of the art bought, confiscated or stolen by the Nazis from throughout Europe during World War II. The overall plan was to turn Linz into one of the greatest art centers of Europe, overshadowing Vienna.  Hitler personally favored German and Austrian paintings from the 19th century, but the collection also contained many early German, Dutch, French, and Italian paintings. The collection, when it was whole, included 4,731 pieces, not just paintings but also tapestries, sculpture, furniture and porcelain. Beginning in February 1944, the artworks were relocated to the 14th-century Steinberg salt mines above the village of Altausee, in which the holdings of various Viennese museums had earlier been transferred.
A portrait depicting Paul Ludwig Troost -by Josef Wilk- was part of the collection of the Führermuseum, which was quite extraordinary, as the collection hardly contained works of contemporary art. This painting is currently in the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin.


Left: Paul Roloff, ‘Bildnis Professor P.L. Troost’, 1936. GDK 1937, room 14. This painting is still in the possession of the U.S. Army Military Centre of History. This work must have hung in the Führerbau in Munich, as the text on a sticker at the back reads: ‘Anschrift Für Die Rucksendung….An den Fuhrerbau…’. Size 140 x 100 cm. Depicted in 'Die Kunst', September, 1937.
Right: Josef Wilk, ‘Porträt Prof. Troost’, showing the Haus der Deutschen Kunst in the background. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin. Size 130 x 110 cm. This painting was part of the collection of the Führermuseum.
   



    




Paul Ludwig Troost, 'Der Erster Baumeister des Führers'
Paul Ludwig Troost, prominent architect of the Third Reich (succeeded by Albert Speer) Paul Ludwig Troost (1878 – 1934) was a German architect, interior designer and painter*. After completing his architecture studies at the Technsiche Hochschule in Darmstadt, Paul Ludwig Troost settled in Munich in 1900 to work mainly as an interior architect. Until the outbreak of WWI he designed several luxury estates and interiors. His style combined Spartan traditionalism with elements of modernity. His severe square-columned stripped Classicism had a considerable influence on Albert Speer later. In 1912 he furnished the North German Lloyd luxury steamer for the American Liner; in 1917 he designed the interiors of the Haus Heineken in Bremen and in 1925 the Jacobihalle in Bremen. The interior of Schloss Cecilienhof in Potsdam was also one of his projects. At the end of the 1920s Troost, a member of the Nazi party since 1924, met Adolf Hitler through Elsa Bruckmann. Hitler instructed him to decorate his home in Prinzregentenplatz. He saw in Paul Ludwig Troost the future architect for National Socialist architecture. In 1931 Troost began, at Hitler's instruction, to work on a concept for the headquarters of the NSDAP in Münich; he remodelled the former Palais Barlow into the Brown House (destroyed in 1945). Along with other architects, Troost planned and built state and municipal edifices throughout the country, including new administrative offices, social buildings for workers and bridges across the main highways. He was also working on the designs for two memorials in Munich. In the autumn of 1933, he was commissioned to rebuild and refurnish the Chancellery residence in Berlin. At the same time he occupied himself with the building of ‘Haus der Deutschen Kunst’ in Munich,  which was to be a showpiece of Nazi painting and sculpture, and which became an icon of Nazi architecture. Its construction and eventual completion were accompanied by huge publicity and various ceremonies and festivities. The large classical colonnade at the front was reminiscent of the Greco-Prussian austerity of Karl Friedrich Schinkel's Altes Museum in Berlin. Paul Ludwig Troost also designed the Führerbau (Führer Building), the Verwaltungsbau (Administration Building) and the Ehrentempels in what was previously called Arcisstraße (now Meiserstraße). The Ehrentempels (‘temples of honour’ for Nazis killed in the 1923 Putsch) were destroyed in 1947. The other offices have survived.
Hitler's relationship to Troost was that of a pupil to an admired teacher. According to Albert Speer, who later succeeded Troost as Hitler's favourite architect, the Führer would impatiently greet Troost with the words: ‘I can't wait, Herr Professor. Is there anything new? Let's see it!’ Troost would then lay out his latest plans and sketches. Hitler frequently declared, according to Speer, that ‘he first learned what architecture was from Troost’. Troost did not live to see the completion of the Haus der Deuschen Kunst. He died on 21 January 1934, after an illness at the age of 55. His unfinished works were completed by his wife Gerdy, an interior designer, who remained a very close confidante of Hitler. During the ceremonies marking the opening of the Haus der Deutschen Kunst in July 1937, Hitler visited the grave of architect Paul Ludwig Troost in the Nordfriedhof.  In 1938, Adolf Hitler awarded in the Neue Reuchskanzlei the ‘Goldene Ehrenzei­chen’ to Paul Ludwig Troost (posthumous); this ‘Deutschen Nationalpreis für Kunst und Wissenschaft’ (German national prize for Art and Science)was established by Hitler as a replacement for the Nobel Prize.
'At the Berghof, among the 534 art works located there in 1945, only a couple could be classified as contemporary pieces. These had a special sentimental value, a portrait of Paul Ludwig Troost for example', wrote Jonathan Petropoulos, in 'Art as politics in the Third Reich'. 
A portrait depicting Paul Ludwig Troost -by Josef Wilk- was part of the collection of the Führermuseum, which was quite extraordinary, as the collection hardly contained works of contemporary art. This painting is currently in the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin.

*Paul Ludwig Troost and Albert Speer are regarded as the two most influential architects of the Third Reich. Troost, however, was also a painter. He started painting in the 1920s, but most of his serious works, approximately 30 to 40 paintings, were created from 1930 to 1933. Paul Ludwig Troost painted women’s portraits ('Frieda Thiersch', 'Gerdy Troost', 'Maiden with Fruits' etc.) and still lifes. The portraits were mostly half-length depictions with single-coloured backgrounds. His still lifes were realistic, three dimensional depictions of fruit, jars, carafes, and books sitting on a wooden table. His still lifes, characterised by regularity and order, were inspired by the works of Cezanne from 1880 to 1895. Most of the paintings of Troost have been lost.