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Otto Rost, Badende

Otto Rost, Badende Otto Rost, Badende Otto Rost, Badende

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'Badende' ('Bathing')
An identical bronze cast of 'Badende' was displayed at the GDK 1940 room 36. It was bought by the 'Reichsjugendführung' in Berlin for 2,000 Reichsmark. The Reichsjugendführung was headed by Reichsjugendführer Baldur von Schirach who became Gauleiter of Vienna on 2 August 1940. It could be that Schirach brought this cast to Austria, as the previous seller lived in Austria. There is no hard evidence of this but we have not seen a cast similar in size and weight (32.2 kg) in several decades.

Left: Otto Rost, 'Badende', bronze, height 80 cm. In the possession of the village Radebeul, Dresden. 
Right: Otto Rost, 'Badende', bronze. GDK 1940 room 36. Bought by the 'Reichsjugendführung' in Berlin for 2.000 Reichsmark. The Reichsjugendführung controlled all administrative and political aspects of the Hitler Jugend movement. It was headed by the Reichsjugendführer, the national leader of the youth movement. From 1928 to 7 August 1940, this position was held by Baldur von Schirach, from 1940 to 1945, it was held by Artur Axmann.
  

- condition  : II                    
- size : 65 x 37,5 x 32 cm 
- signed : at the foot ('O. Rost 38')
- type : bronze            
- misc. : weight: 33,2 kg



 

Otto Rost, 'Grosse Kniende' ('Large kneeling Woman'), 1938. Sandstone sculpture, height 125 cm. Still located on the river bank of the Elbe in Dresden, before the café Rosengarten. The sculpture was placed on the base of the in the war destroyed figure 'Mädchens mit Gazelle' by Prof. Wrba (teacher of Rost). Photo: December 2016.
  


Otto Rost, 'Wehrhafte Jugend' ('Resileint Youth'), plaster model, over life-size. Created 1937. Design for a building of the Luftkreiskommando III in Dresden.



Left: Otto Rost, 'Die grosse Badende' ('Large bathing Woman'), executed in 1960. Located on the grounds of the swimming pool of the city of Döbeln.  
Right: Otto Rost, 'Badende', GDK 1943 room 32. Executed in metal, bought by the Deutsche Arbeitersfront Berlin for 3.000 Reichsmark.
  


Otto Rost, 'Rugbykampf' ('Rugbygame'). At the exhibition ‘Olympischer Kunstwettbewerb’ in Berlin, held in 1936 at the same time as the Olympic Games, Otto Rost’s work ‘Rugbykampf’ received an honorable mention.



Left: Otto Rost, 'Tuchbinderin', GDK 1941 room 2. Life-size. Depicted in 'Die Kunst für alle', 1941/42.
Right: Otto Rost, 'Stabchef der SA Wilhelm Schepmann' ('Chief of Staff of the SA Wilhelm Schepmann'). Displayed at the Grosse Dresdner Kunstausstellung 1943, Dresdner Künstlerbund. Depicted in the official exhibition catalogue.
  


Left: Otto Rost, 'Psyche', plaster model in his atelier. Photo 1942/43.
Right: Otto Rost, 'Psyche', executed in bronze. GDK 1943 room 8. 
  


Oto Rost, 'Badende', 1939, height 75 cm, executed in brass. In the possession of the Kurhaus of the city of Bad Elster. The same model was displayed at the GDK 1939 room 32.  



Otto Rost, ‘Diana’, on the roof of the Humboldt University, Unter den Linden, Berlin. In 1952 Rost created a copy of ‘Diana’. This was a replacement of one of the six original 2.88-meter-high sandstone figures, created in 1749/50 on the orders of the Prussian king Friedrich II, and destructed during the war.
Left: ‘Diana’, in the middle.
Right: ‘Diana’, second from the right.
  



Ehrenmal der Roten Armee, Dresden
In 1945, shortly after the Russians occupied Germany, Rost created the ‘Ehrenmal der Roten Armee’ (war memorial for the Russian Army), placed at the Albert Platz in Dresden. For that reason the slightly damaged, renowned fountain at that place, ‘Stürmische Wogen’ by Robert Diez, was removed (Stürmische Wogen was awarded the Gold Medal at the World Exhibition in 1900 in Paris). After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1994, Rost's Russian war memorial was moved to another location in Dresden (Olbrichtplatz) and the Stürmische Wogen of 1875 was reconstructed in its original location.
Left: the War Memorial at the Olbrichtplatz in 2008 (photo: December 2016).
Right: Otto Rost in his atelier, summer 1945. At the back the still unfinished model of the War Memorial. Model for the sculpture stood the son of the owner of Rost's house and atelier, Rudolf Desiderius.
  
  


Left: Otto Rost, ‘Ehrendenkmal Freiberg’ (‘Soviet War Memorial, Freiberg’), 1947. Height of bronze: 2 meters, including flag 3,5 meters.
Right: Otto Rost, ‘Sowjetische Ehrenmal Schwedt’ (‘Soviet War Memorial, city of Schwedt’), 1949. Total height 5 meters; almost the same monument as the one in Dresden. The memorial has disappeared.
  


Otto Rost, 'Gemeinnutz' ('Common Good') and 'Eigennutz' ('Selfinterest'), 1934. Two larger then life-size sculptures placed in the building of the Justice Department in Leipzig. In 1942 Rost was awarded the ‘Alfred Rosenberg Preis’ for these two scuptures, which are still located in the building of the Cantonal Court in Leipzig
Left: Otto Rost, 'Gemeinnutz' (notice the open, giving hand).
Right: Otto Rost, 'Eigennutz', (notice the left hand with a small money-bag).
Below: Otto Rost, both sculptures in the cantonal Court in Leipzig, around 2005 (Justizgebäude Leipzig, Beethovenstrasse 2). At the right one of the huge reliefs, further described below.
  




Otto Rost, two sandstone reliefs, each 3,50 meters high, created for the Amtsgericht Leipzig in 1935 (still existing). One is depicted at the photo above.
Left: ‘Wenn die Gerechtigkeit untergeht, so hat es keinen Wert mehr, wenn Menschen auf Erden leben’.
Right: ‘Führe nicht im Munde immer die Worte: Ich und meine recht. Denke aber im geiste immer der Worte: Du ein meine Pflicht’.



Otto Rost, ‘Familie unf Arbeit’ (‘Family and Labour’), 1939. Stone-relief for the building of the Deutsche Arbeitersfront in Döblen. Still existing in the Franz Mehring-Strasse.



Left: Otto Rost, ‘Die Blüte’ (‘Blossoming’), plaster. Displayed at the Kunstausstellung Gau Sachsen, 1943, Sächsicher Kunstverein Dresden.
Right: Otto Rost, ‘Fechtersgruss’ (‘Saluation’), plaster, around 1929.
Both works are depicted in ’Otto Rost, Leben und Werk’, 2006, by Enst-Günter Knüppel.

   


Otto Rost, sandstone-sculptures at the facade of the 'Haus Altmarkt' in the centre of Dresden, 1955. Over life-size. Photo: December 2016.



Otto Rost, reliefs (in total 16) at the facade of a residential building in the Fritz-Löffler-strasse, Dresden. Photo: December 2016.
 



Otto Rost, ‘Mauersberger Totentanz’ ('Mauersberger Death-dance'), 1952. Relief of 10.12 meters lenght in the Kreuzkapelle Mauersberg, near Marienberg (detail).



Saxon Marble
Otto Rost, ‘Kriegerdenkmal Döbeln’ (‘War Memorial on the Geyersberg, city of Döbeln’), 1922. The memorial consisted of a huge obelisk from ‘Rochlitzer Porphyr’, a red volcanic stone also called ‘Saxon Marble’. The sarcophagus was at three sides provided with a high relief of a soldier and two women. The corporal Dietze from Döblen served as modell for the solder. The two women represented ‘Grief’ respectively ‘Hope for Germany’. The Memorial does not exist anymore.


Otto Rost, depicted in the book 'Otto Rost 1887 - 1970', by Ernst-Günther Knüppel.






Otto Paul Rost, the sculptor from Saxony
Otto Paul Rost (1887–1970), born in the city of Döbeln, was the son of a mill worker. Rost, who grew up in poor circumstances, was in 1901 apprenticed to a bridle-maker and, later, to a metal chaser in the  Gustav Bühnert metal-wares factory in Döbeln. In 1909 he went to the Kunstgewerbeschule in Dresden where he studied under Prof. Hugo Spieler, Prof. Richard Guhr, Johannes Turk and Prof. Karl Gross. In 1914 he went into military service. Rost, who was promoted to corporal, fought in Lithuania against the Russians and later in Verdun against the French. In the autumn of 1918 he was taken as a prisoner of war in France; he was released in November 1919. From 1920 to 1923 he studied at the Art Academy in Dresden under Prof. Wrba. During this time he was commissioned to create a huge war memorial for the city of Döbeln, a large obelisk with at three sites a high relief of a soldier and two women. In 1923 he settled in Dresden, became a member of the Dresdner Artist Association and opened his own atelier. Over the next few years he took part in exhibitions in Dresden and other Saxon cities, as well as in Berlin, Bremen, Düsseldorf, Cologne and Munich. In 1933 he became a member of the NSDAP. A year later he was commissioned to create two larger than life-size sculptures for the building of the Justice Department in Leipzig: ‘Eigennutz’ (‘Self-interest’) and ‘Gemeinnutz’ (‘Common good’). At the exhibition ‘Olympischer Kunstwettbewerb’ in Berlin, held in 1936 at the same time as the Olympic games, Otto Rost’s work ‘Rugbykampf’ (‘Rugby game’) received an honourable mention. Two years later he created ‘Grosse Kniende’ (‘Large kneeling woman’), a sandstone sculpture still located on the river bank of the Elbe in Dresden. In 1939 Rost became a teacher of sculpting at the Art Academy in Dresden, in which position he in fact succeeded Prof. Wrba. In 1942 Rost was awarded the ‘Alfred Rosenberg Preis’ for his sculptures Eigennutz and Gemeinnutz, which are still located in the building of the Cantonal Court in Dresden.
At the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellungen, Rost was represented with 13 works including: ‘Junges Deutschland’ (GDK 1939), ‘Badende’ (GDK 1940, bought by the Reichsjugendführung), ‘Tuchbinderin’ (GDK 1941), ‘Psyche’ (GDK 1943) and ‘Badende’ (GDK 1943, bought by the Deutsche Arbeitsfront Berlin).
In 1945, shortly after the Russians occupied Germany, Rost created the ‘Ehrenmal der Roten Armee’ (War Memorial for the Russian Army), placed at the Albertplatz in Dresden. For that reason the slightly damaged renowned fountain at that place, ‘Stürmische Wogen’ by Robert Diez, was removed (Stürmische Wogen was awarded the Gold Medal at the World Exhibition in 1900 in Paris). After the fall of the Berlin Wall, in 1994, Rost’s Russian war memorial was moved to another location in Dresden (Olbrichtplatz) and the Stürmische Wogen of 1875 was reconstructed in its original location. After the creation of the ‘Ehrenmal der Roten Armee’ in Dresden, the Russians commissioned Rost to create many more war memorials in Freiberg, Schwedt and in Czechoslovakia and Poland. In 1952 Rost created the well-known ‘Mauersberger Totentanz’, a relief of 10.12 meters in the Kreuzkapelle Mauersberg. In the same year, he created a copy of ‘Diana’ on the roof of Humboldt University in Berlin. This was a replecement of one of the six original 2.88-meter-high sandstone figures, created in 1749/50 on the orders of the Prussian king Friedrich II, and destructed during the war.
Otto Rost died in 1970 in the city of Döbeln.
Many sculptures, reliefs and war memorials by Otto Rost still exist in Saxony.