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Oskar Martin-Amorbach, Mother and Child

Oskar Martin-Amorbach, Mother and Child Oskar Martin-Amorbach, Mother and Child Oskar Martin-Amorbach, Mother and Child

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Price:€ 4000.00

Description

'Mother and Child' ('Mutter und Kind')

Painting in fresco style.

Amorbach has created this Madonna and Child image revealing his admiration for the 15th Century Old Masters. The artist has prepared his canvas using a hardened, sandy, ground layer to simulate an actual wall while his paint application has beautifully re-created the sensitivity and reverence of this iconic Italianesque image.

Madonna-like depictions of a mother and child, traditionally appreciated by the Church, also became a favourite genre for the Nazis.
'The woman has her own battlefield. With every child she brings to the world, she fights her battle for the nation. The man stands up for the People, exactly as the woman stands up for her family, proclaimed Hitler in a speech to the National Socialist Women’s Congress in 1935.
'She is a woman who, above all, is able to be a mother… She becomes a mother not merely because the State wants it, or because her husband wants it, but because she is proud to bring healthy children into the world, and to bring them up for the nation,' Reichsminister Rudolf Hess, at a meeting of the Women’s Association in 1936. (Peter Adam, 'The Arts of the Third Reich')

- condition : II               
- size : 80 x 69 cm, unframed 62 x 51 cm
- signed : right, under
- type : mixed techniques on canvas         
- misc. : professional cleaned and reframed



Left: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Der Sämann' ('The Sower'). GDK 1937, room 8. Depicted in 'Westermanns Monatshefte', 1938. 
In 1989 ‘Der Sämann’ was shown in Paris at the exhibition ‘Munich 1937, l’art diffamé, l’art acclamé, organised by the Goethe Institute at Paris. The painting is in the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin. Size: 257 x 177 cm.   
Right: 'Der Sämann displayed in 1977 at the Exhibition ‘Deutschland 1930-1939, Verbot, Anpassung, Exil’ in Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland. Again displayed at the exhibition 'The Romantic Spirit in German Art 1790 - 1990', organised by the Royal Scottish Academy, Edingburgh/ London, 1994/95.  
  


Oskar Martin-Amorbach, second version of 'Der Sämann' which hung in the 'Haus der Deutschen Erziehung zu Bayreuth ('House of German Eduaction in Bayreuth'). Depicted in 'Westermann Montashefte', 1939, and in 'Das bauerliche Jahr, ein Buch vom Bauerntum in Bildern deutscher Maler', 1939. 



Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Flandern 1940' ('Flanders 1940'). GDK 1941, room 27. Bought for 12.000 RM by Theo Memmel, mayor of Würzburg. Displayed in 1943 at the exhibition 'Neuerwerbungen der Stadt Würzburg' organized by the 'Mainfränkische Kunstverein'. Also displayed at the exhibition ‘Maler an der Front’ (‘Painters at the Front’), organized by the ‘Oberkommando des Heeres‘ (Supreme High Command of the German Army) in combination with the ‘Hauptstelle Bildende Kunst in der Dienstelle des Reichsleiters Rosenberg’ (‘Amt Rosenberg‘) and the ‘Reichsminsterium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda‘, April 1941, Berlin. Depicted in 'die Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1941. The painting is lost.



Left: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Erntetag' ('Harvest'). GDK 1938, room 15. Bought by Hitler for 12.000 Reichsmark. Depicted on the cover of the magazine 'Frauen Warte', 1938/39. 
Oskar Martin-Amorbach, ‘Madonna’, 1933. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst’, November 1933.
   


Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Sie fahren den Tod' ('They carry Death'). GDK 1942, room 15. Bought by Hitler for 22.000 Reichsmark. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Size: 422 x 272 cm.



Joseph Goebels visiting the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung 1942. Next to Goebbels on his right Prof. Karl Kolb, director of the Haus der Deutschen Kunst, on his left Gerdy Troost. ‘Sie fahren den Tod’ at the background.



Left: Oskar Martin-Amorberg, ‘Abendfriede‘ (‘Evening-peace‘). GDK 1944, room 15. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst in Deutschen Reich, 1944.
Right: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Heimkehr' ('Returning Home'). GDK 1941, room 15. Bought for 12.000 Reichsmark by Theo Memmel, Mayor of Würzburg.
  


Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Im Tagewerk' ('Dayly Life'). GDK 1941, room 16. Bought by Hitler for 5.500 Reichsmark. In the possession of Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Size: 219 x 124 cm.



Oskar Martin-Amorbach, 'Im Tagewerk' displayed in 1977 at the Exhibition ‘Deutschland 1930-1939, Verbot, Anpassung, Exil’ in Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland (at the right 'Kalenberger Bauernfamilie' by Adolf Wissel).



Oskar Martin-Amorbach, ‘Der Abend‘ (‘The Evening‘), 1937. GDK 1939, room 15. Bought by Hitler for 15.000 Reichmark. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Depicted in 'The Arts of the Third Reich', by Peter Adam, 1992 and in 'Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1939. Size: 342 x 320 cm.



Oskar Martin-Amorbach, fresco’s in the Aussegnungshalle (Benediction Hall) at the graveyard Westfriedhof in Ingolstadt. Created 1933 – 1935. The wall at the end of the Hall depicts the Resurrection of Jesus. The broad frescos at both side-walls show a Dance Macabre. The Hall measures 200 square meters with a ceiling of 14 meters high. A text on a clock at the exit of the Hall reads ‘Eine dieser Stunden wird deine letzte sein’ (‘One of these hours will be your last’).
  


Left: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, ‘Ausschnitt aus den Ingolstädter Totentanz’, displayed at the ‘Münchener Kunst Sonder Ausstellungen, in der neuen Pinakothek, 1935.
Right: detail of the Dance Macabre fresco’s.
  


Oskar Martin-Amorbach, three fresco‘s (‘Deckengemälde‘) on the ceiling of the Dreifaltigkeitskirche Kappl near Waldassen, Bavaria. Created in Baroque style in the period 1934-1940.
Left: ‘Gott Vater‘ (‘Godfather‘).
Right: ‘Gott Sohn’ (‘God-Son’).
Below: ‘Heiliger Geist’ (‘Holy Sprit’)
  


Oskar Martin-Amorbach,'Madonna', displayed at the exhibition 'Staatliche Kunst- Ausstellung München', 1933, in the Neue Pinakothek. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue.



Left: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, ‘Feierabend an der Pferdetränke’ (‘Quitting time at the Drinking Trough’). Signed 1948, size 130 x 110 cm.
Right: Feierabend an der Pferdetränke’ displayed at the exhibition ‘Ingolstädter Maler und Bildhauer im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert, 2009/2010, Stadtmuseum Ingolstadt. Depicted in ‘Ingolstädter Maler und Bildhauer im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert’, 2009.
  


Left: Oskar Martin-Amorbach in his atelier in the 60s.
Right: Oskar Martin-Amorbach, self-portrait. 
  






Oskar Martin-Amorbach
Oskar Martin-Amorbach (1897–1987), was the son of an auditor and at the age of 17 he went to the Royal Kunstgewerbeschule in Munich. His studies were interrupted by the First World War. From 1916–1919 he was a dispatch rider and took part in the battles of Flanders, where he was seriously wounded. The impressions he garnered in the First Word War can be found in some of his paintings, for example in ‘Sie fahren in den Tod’. In 1920 he continued his studies in Munich where he became a pupil of Professor Becker-Gundal and Meisterschüler of Professor Franz von Stuck. He became famous with his large crucifixion group, a fresco of 25 m2, in the Munich Glaspalast. Several orders from churches for frescos and paintings followed. From 1933 to 1935 Martin-Amorbach cretaed the monumental fresco’s in the Aussegnungshalle (Benediction Hall) at the graveyard Westfriedhof in Ingolstadt: the wall at the end of the Hall depicts the Resurrection of Jesus, the broad frescos at both side-walls show a Dance Macabre. Besides church frescos and paintings, Martin-Amorbach painted country and farmer sceneries in the Realistic style of Wilhelm Leibl and Franz von Defregger, as well as war themes. The last motives were of great importance in the National Socialist Ideology. On 16 July 1939, at the ‘Day of German Art’, the Professor title was granted to him by the Nazis. Martin-Amorbach, a member of the NSDAP, was appointed Professor for History painting at the Akademie für bildende Künste in Berlin in 1943.
At the Great German Art Exhibitions Martin-Amorbach was represented with 12 works, which were farmer sceneries as well as military motives. Hitler bought at the exhibitions ‘Erntetag’, ‘Abend’, ‘Im Tagewerk’ and ‘Sie fahren den Tod’ for prices of up to 22,000 Reichsmark.
The City of Würzburg honored Martin-Amorbach in 1981 by giving him the Albertus-Magnus-Medal, and the city where he was born (Amorbach) granted him in 1982 the ‘Ehrenteller der Stadt Amorbach’. In 1989 ‘Der Sämann’ was shown in Paris during the exhibit ‘Munich 1937, l’art diffamé, l’art acclamé, organised by the Goethe Institute at Paris.
The Deutches Historisches Museum is in the possession of ‘Abend’, ‘Der Sämann’, ‘Im Tagewerk’ and ‘Sie fahren den Tod’. 'Der Sämann' and 'Im Tagewerk' were displayed in 1977 at the Exhibition ‘Deutschland 1930-1939, Verbot, Anpassung, Exil’ in Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland.