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Ivo Saliger, Junge Frau

Ivo Saliger, Junge Frau Ivo Saliger, Junge Frau Ivo Saliger, Junge Frau

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Price:€ 10500.00

Description

'Junge Frau' ('Young woman') 

Saliger often painted women as fantasized and idealized images of male desire. This not only reflected but also helped to formulate women’s position in Nazi culture.  Although many women were portrayed as icons of beauty, the formulaic and debased classical style in which they were painted tended to de-eroticize them, emphasizing instead their utilitarian procreative function. In 1934 Goebbels explained the role that women were to play in the Nazi design of things when he wrote, “Women have the task of being beautiful and bringing children into the world, and this is by no means as coarse and old fashioned as one might think. The female bird preens herself for her mate and hatches her eggs for him.”

- condition : II                     
- size : 45 x 30,5 cm, excluding frame 
- signed : left, on top
- type : oil on canvas                                  



Left: Ivo Saliger, postcard*, 'Die Sinne' ('The Sense'). GDK 1941, room 22. Bought for 8.000 RM by Theo Memmel, mayor of the City of Würzberg. In the possession of the Museum Kulturspeicher, Würzburg. Displayed at the exhibition ‘Tradition & Propaganda’, 2013, organized by the Museum Kulturspeicher, 2015.
Right: Ivo Saliger, 'Hymne an die Natur' ('Hymne to nature'), artprint. GDK 1939, room 22.
   

  
Ivo saliger, 'Einklang' '('Harmony'), postcard. GDK 1941, room 22. Bought for 5.000 Reichsmark by the Nazi-architect professor Clemens Klotz.



Left: Ivo Saliger, postcard, 'Das Bad der Diana'  ('The Bath of Diana'). GDK 1940, room 25. Bought by Reichminister Von Ribbentrop for 7.000 RM.
Right: Ivo Saliger, 'An der Waldquelle' ('The Souce in the Forest'). GDK 1942, room 23. Sold for 12.000 Euro in 2013 (damaged).
     


Left: Ivo Saliger, 'Urteil des Paris' ('Judgement of Paris'), postcard. GDK 1939, room 8, size 210 x 170 cm. Bought by Adolf Hitler for 4.000 RM. In the possession of Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Also displayed at the exhibition ‘Kunst im 3. Reich, Dokumente der Unterwerfung’; the exhibition, instigated by the Frankfurter Kunstverein, was held from 1974 to 1975 in Frankfurt, Hamburg, Stuttgart, Ludwigshafen and Wuppertal. 
Right: 'Urteil des Paris' displayed in 1977 at the Exhibition ‘Deutschland 1930-1939, Verbot, Anpassung, Exil’ in Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland (at the right Werner Peiners 'Europa und der Stier').
  


Right: Ivo Saliger, 'Die Rast der Diana' ('Diana's Rest'). GDK 1940, room 31. Bought by Hitler for 6.000 RM. In the possession of the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin. Size 215 x 205 cm.



Ivo Saliger, ‘Nach dem Bade’ (‘After bathing’). GDK 1939, room 25. Bought by Hitler for 1.800 Reichsmark. In the possession of Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin.



Left: Ivo Saliger, ‘Der Arzt, das Mädchen und der Tod‘ (‘the doctor, the girl and death‘), 1920. Size: 73 x 53.4 cm. In 1920 Saliger created his famous etching ‘Der Arzt, das Mädchen und der Tod‘: ’A female figure, barely alive, clinging to the physician, who is attempting to fend off Death, who in turn threatening the patient’s life. Perhaps intuitively, I portrayed the face of the physician with a skepticism, an uncertainty, whether the fight will end well or not. Well, to conclude – the physician’s eternal fight with Death, is to save human lives…’, wrote Ivo Saliger in 1973. The etching, which creation took him 2 months, was based on the illness of his sister, who died in 1920 as a result of Leukemia. The story was told in a letter of 6 December 1973 from Saliger to a student at Case Western Reserve University. The student, Mrs.Killpack, had written to Saliger asking him about the motivation that lay behind Der Arzt. His response is now in the Archives at the Dittrick Medical History Center (on request available).
Right: Depicted in ‘Hamilton Evening Journal’ (Ohio), 19 June 1925. The tekst under the picture reads: ‘DOWN, YOU MONGREL DEATH!. Striking Humanitarian Conception, by the Celebrated Austrian Artist, Herr Ivo Saliger, of Science’s Determination to Crush the deadly Pneumoceus, Shown Symbolically Attempting to Carry Off a Stricken Maiden. From the World-Famous Etching’.  
  


Ivo Saliger, 'Landliches Verlobungsfest' ('Country Engagement Party'). Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasing', 1940.
 





Ivo Saliger
Austrian artist Ivo Saliger (1894 – 1987), born in Köningsberg (now Kalingrad), was known both for his original etchings and for his paintings. He moved to Vienna in 1908 at the same time as Adolf Hitler. Unlike Hitler, however, he was admitted and studied painting and etching techniques at the Academy of Vienna, under some of Austria’s finest artists such as Rudolf Jettmar, Ludwig Michalek and Ferdinand Schmutzer. In 1917 he received the State Prize for graphic art. Saliger completed his studies at the Academie Moderne, in Paris. He returned to Vienna in 1920 to assume the post of professor of art at the academy.
Also in 1920, Saliger created his famous etching ‘Der Arzt, das Mädchen und der Tod‘: ’A female figure, barely alive, clinging to the physician, who is attempting to fend off Death, who in turn threatening the patient’s life. Perhaps intuitively, I portrayed the face of the physician with a skepticism, an uncertainty, whether the fight will end well or not. Well, to conclude – the physician’s eternal fight with Death, is to save human lives…’, wrote Ivo Saliger in 1973. The  etching, which took him 2 months to create, was based on his sister, who died in 1920 as a result of Leukemia. During the 1920s and 1930s, Ivo Saliger developed strong Art Deco elements within his art. Occasionally he painted under the pseudonym of Ovid Serlagi. He was a member of the Zentralverbandes bildender Künstler Österreichs. When German soldiers marched into Austria, Saliger, like many other artists, started to paint images in support of the Third Reich. At the Great German Art Exhibitions Saliger was represented with 16 works, all of them nudes. Adolf Hitler bought 5 of them. Other works were bought by Joseph Goebbels, the mayor of Würzburg Theo Memmel and Reichsminster Von Ribbentrop.
Ivo Saliger died in 1987 in Vienna.
The Deutsches Historisches Museum in Berlin is in the possession of 'Nach dem Bade' (GDK 1939, room 25), 'Urteil des Paris (GDK 1939, room 8) and 'Rast der Diana' (GDK 1940, room 31); all three works were bought by Hitler. 'Die Sinne' (GDK 1941, room 220), bought for 8.000 RM by Theo Memmel, mayor of the City of Würzberg, is in the possession of the Museum Kulturspeicher, Würzburg. The work 'Urteil des Paris' was displayed in 1977 at the Exhibition ‘Deutschland 1930-1939, Verbot, Anpassung, Exil’ in Kunsthaus Zürich, Switzerland.

* As also stated in our General Terms and Conditions, German Art Gallery offers the depicted postcards and artprints for sale. Allmost all of these postcards are 'Haus der Deutschen Kunst' editions. Prices on request.