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Hubert Netzer, Siegfried

Hubert Netzer, Siegfried Hubert Netzer, Siegfried Hubert Netzer, Siegfried

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Description

'Siegfried'
Single unique cast, with core still inside (see X-ray photos below).
Bronze, signed 1919.

Smaller version of the 'Siegfried' War Memorial on the Cemetery of Honor in Duisburg-Kaiserberg (designed in 1915, cast in 1919, erected in 1921).

Direct Lost-Wax Casting - the Single Unique Cast
In the direct lost-wax casting process (also named ‘cire perdue’), the sculptor begins by building a roughly modelled clay-core over a metal armature. The clay-core is baked to harden it and drive off moisture, and then a relatively thin layer of wax is applied that receives the detailing of anatomy, texture, facial features and signature.
A mold is formed around the wax-model, when the mold is heated the wax melts and creates a space into which molten bronze is poured. Once the bronze is cast, the clay-core and armature can be removed to lessen the weight of the finished sculpture. Occasionally the core and armature rods are -in whole or in part- left inside the bronze. On sculptures meant to be placed outdoors, the clay-core and iron-armature are generally removed in order to avoid damage from absorption of water.
The direct lost wax technique allows the artist to cast directly off of the original model, and is ideal for wax models with complex surface textures as well as large and complex compositions. This casting method produces a Single Unique Cast from a Single Model (as opposed to one that is cast from a mold of an existing model). The original master model is lost in the casting process: producing more copies of the master model is impossible.
When X-ray photos show iron armature or internal frame inside the bronze, it is evident that the direct lost wax casting technique was used and that we have to do with the original cast/model.


X-ray photos taken in 2019 of the (smaller) cast. Clearly visible are the iron wires from the core inside.
  



Signed with 'Düsseldf. Broncebild Giesserei G.M.B.H.




'Siegfried' War Memorial
The 'Siegfried' War Memorial in the city of Duisburg: 'Denkmal Ehrenfriedhof für die Gefallenen des Ersten Weltkriegs auf dem Duisburger Kaiserberg' (still exhisting).
    




Left: 'Siegfried' by Netzer, displayed at the 'Grosse Kunstausstelling 1920', Düsseldorf. Depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte', December 1920. 
Right: 'Siegfried' by Netzer, depicted in 'Jugend', 1921, Heft 16. 
  

'Siegfried, depicted in 'Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1939.




- condition : II             
- size : height 46,5 cm
- signed : signed on base 'H. Netzer 1919'
- type : bronze              
- misc. : with foundry mark 'Düsseldf. Broncebildgiesserei G.M.B.H.'

 

Hubert Netzer, ‘Prometheus’, 1896, located on the gable of the central structure of the University of Würzburg. Shown is Prometheus swinging the torches of intellectual progress against the dark forces of ignorance and barbarism for truth and justice. A bronze plaque with the inscription ‘Veritati’ is a reminder that the building was devoted to the truth. The inscription was the personal motto of the Würzburg theologian Herman Schell who was the rector of the university at the time.





Hubert Netzer, 'Fürs Vaterland' ('For the Fatherland'). World War I Memorial Plate, city of Düsseldorf. Depicted in 'Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich', 1939.



Hubert Netzer, ‘Six Images of the Virtues’. Façade of the former country and district court building in Mühlenstraße, Düsseldorf-Altstadt ('Ehemaligen Amtsgericht'). Created around 1923.
 


Hubert Netzer, 'Diana'.
Left: 'Diana', depicted in 'Jugend', 1904, Heft 15
Middle: 'Diana', bronze. Displayed at the 'Internationalen Kunst-Ausstellung des Vereins Bildender Künstler Münchens (e.V.) -Secession- 1903'. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue. Also displayed at the 'Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung', 1903.
Right: 'Diana', by Netzer. A bronze cast sold in 2017 by a German Auction house. Height 40 cm.  
      



Hubert Netzer, 'Nornenbrunnen' ('Fountain of the Norns'), created in 1907, Munich.
In Norse mythology there are three Norns -Goddesses of fate- who live at the well Urd in Asgard (home of the Gods and Goddesses). Their names are 'Urd' What Once Was), 'Verdandi' (What Is Coming into Being), and 'Skuld' (What Shall Be).
Left: 'Statuten der Verdandi und Urd vom Nornenbrunnen in München'. Depicted in 'Jugend 1907, Heft 37.
Below: the three Norns depicted in 'Die Rheinlande, -Monatsschrift für Deutsche Kunst und Dichtung', 1921.
 





Hubert Netzer, 'Ehrenfriedhof', -Schillerstrasse Homburg-Duisburg, 1928 (War Memorial, -Memorial Hall of the Ehrenfriedhof in the Schillerstraße in Duisburg-Homberg). In the wall the names are inscribed of all fallen civilians and soldiers from the village of Homburg during the wars of: 1864, 1866, 1870/71, 1914-1918 and 1939-1945.





‘Narcissus admiring himself in the fountain’

Hubert Netzer, ‘Narzissbrunnen im Hof des Bayerischen Nationalmuseums‘ (Narcissus fountain in the southwestern garden part of the Bavarian National Museum in Munich).
Displayed in room 3 at the ‘VII. Internationalen Kunstausstellung im königlichen Glaspalast zu München‘, 1897; bought by the city of Munich.




'Narzissbrunnen' by Netzer, depicted in 'Jugend', 1902, Heft 17.



Second Narzissbrunnen in Potsdam
Hubert Netzer created a second bronze cast of 'Narzissbrunnen' and displayed this one at the 'Berliner Kunstausstellung 1903'. This cast was bought by the German Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria (1858 - 1921) and placed in 1904 in the Rosengarten near the Neue Palais im Park Sanssouci, Potsdam. 
In 1976 the fountain was relocated to the courtyard of Cecilienhof Palace (UNESCO protected site in Potsdam).
Apparently Netzer later created a third Narzissbrunnen in stone, placed in a courtyard of an unknown castlle.

The Narzissbrunnen in the courtyard of Cecilienhof Palace, Potsdam.


The New York Times, August 12, 1903, Page 8.


Somewhere between 1904 and 1976: cast of Narzissbrunnen in the Rosengarten near the Neue Palais im Park Sanssouci, Potsdam. 




Left: Hubert Netzer, 'Faustkämpfer' ('Boxer'). GDK 1939 room 2. Plaster. Depicted in 'Kunst dem Volk', 1939.



'Miotacz Blyskawic'
Left: Hubert Netzer, ‘Blitzeschleuderer’. Depicted is ‘Donar’ or ‘Donnergott’,  the Germanic God of Thunder, throwing lightning bolts. Located in the roundabout on the Heinz-Ingenstau-Straße in Düsseldorf. Bronze, cast in 1924/1925 by the foundry Gustav Schmäke. Weight 1900 kilogram. Height 5 meter, excluding base of 3,6 meter. Cast by foundry Düsseldorfer Bronzegießerei GmbH. Bronze: 86% copper, 5% tin, 9% zinc and lead. 
Initially designed in 1911/1912 as 'Welttelegraphen Denkmal' (named 'Zeus') for the Helvetiaplatz in Berlin. Re-designed in 1918 and displayed at the exhibition ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1918.
The Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen owns a bronze cast of Blitzeschleuder of 68 x 65 cm.
A cast of 'Blitzeschleuderer' (size unknown) was displayed under the name of 'Miotacz Blyskawic' at the 'Ausstellung Deutsche Bildhauer der Gegenwart' in Krakow, 1938.
Right: initial design of 'Blizteschleuderer' by Netzer, depicted in 'Jugend', 1912, Heft 10 (here named: 'Young Zeus'). Also depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1912.
  

Initially designed in 1911/1912 as 'Welttelegraphen Denkmal' (named 'Zeus') for the Helvetiaplatz in Berlin. Depictd in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1911/12.



Hubert Netzer, 'Rheintochter' ('Daughter of the river Rhine'). GDK 1937 room 7. Plaster.


Left: Hubert Netzer, the same sculpture now named ‘Brunnenfigur in Kleinmachnow bei Berlin’ (‘Fountain-figure in Kleinmachnow near Berlin’). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich’, 1939. Original it was designed for a fountain.
Right: in 1937 Netzer was commissioned by the Reichspost Minister Dr. Ohnesorge, to create the GDK-plaster ‘Rheintöchter’ in limestone, and in a large format (2,2 meters high). The sculpture, agreed price was 15.000 Reichsmark, was placed at the grounds of the Neue Hakeburg. It is still located at its original place, near the east entrance of the courtyard.
Neu Hakeburg, a large castle-like villa, is in Kleinmachnow looking over the Machnower sea. The mansion was built on top of the hill Seeberg in 1906. Dietloff von Hake wanted his mansion to be grand and showy, but this cost him quite a lot and after WWI he got himself into economic difficulties. In 1937 he had to sell the mansion to the German Reichspost, headed by Reichspost Minister Dr. Ohnesorge. The complete interior was redesigned, amongst others with Sgraffitos by Carl Crodel showing pictures of ancient wind gods and stars. In 1946 the whole area on the Seeberg was assigned to the just established SED (Socialist Unity Party of Germany), and the Hakeburg beame an ideological centre of the German Democratic Republic. In 1995 Deutsche Telecom became the owner of the Hakeburg. Today the mansion is an apartment complex under construction.
 

 
Hubert Netzer, 'Sinnende Klio', or 'Trauernde Muse' ('Sorrowing Muse'), city of Bonn, 1921.


'Klio' by Netzer, displayed at the 'Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung', 1918, Düsseldorf. Depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1918/19. Plaster.


Hubert Netzer, ‘Jonasbrunnen’ (‘Jonah Fountain’), created in Untersberger-marble, 1911. Destroyed in WWII. Depicted in ‘Die Kunst für Alle‘, August 1911.



Hubert Netzer, ‘Young Siegfried‘, or ‘Wehrfreiheitsdenkmal‘. Located at the Theatherplatz in Nordhausen. Revealed at 15 May 1936, destructed at 27 may 1945, 6 weeks after American troops concurred the village.
Memorial commissioned by the Nordhausen industrialist Otto Kruse, commemorating the remilitarization of the Rhineland by the German Army on 7 March 1936. Other sources say the memorial is commemorating the reintroduction of conscription in 1935.




Hubert Netzer, ‘Spinx Relief, -Gedenkstein für die Opfer des 10. Januar 1919‘, located on the Nordfriedhof, Düsseldorf.
The ‘Spartacist uprising’ (‘Spartakusaufstand’), also known as the January uprising, was a general strike in Berlin from 5 to 12 January 1919. Germany was in the middle of a post-war revolution, and two of the perceived paths forward were either social democracy or a council republic similar to the one which had been established by the Bolsheviks in Russia. The uprising was primarily a power struggle between the moderate Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD) led by Friedrich Ebert, and the radical communists of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD), led by Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg, who had previously founded and led the Spartacist League (Spartakusbund). Liebknecht called for the overthrow of the government. The rather improvised revolt in downtown Berlin -with 500.000 protestors- was quickly crushed by the ex-military Freikorps, who arrested and killed Liebknecht and Luxemburg on 15 January.
Similar uprisings occurred and were suppressed in Bremen, the Ruhr, Rhineland, Saxony, Hamburg, Thuringia and Bavaria, and a round of bloodier street battles occurred in Berlin in March.
 




Left: Hubert Netzer, ‘Morpheus, Marmorfigur für ein Grabmal‘ (‘Morpheus, marblefigur for a Grave‘). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘, 1939.
Displayed under the name of 'Morfeusz' at the 'Ausstellung Deutsche Bildhauer der Gegenwart' in Krakow, 1938.
Right: ‘Morpheus, -Family grave of the Nordhäuser industrialist Otto Kruse’. Located on the Zentralfriedhof in Nordhäusen.
 



The Orpheus Brunnen
Hubert Netzer, ‘Orpheus Brunnen’. ‘Fountain of Orpheus’, the lyrist of Greek mythology who yearned to retrieve his wife, Eurydice, from Hades. Created in 1900. Displayed in 1900 at the 'Münchener Jahres-Ausstellung 1900‘, in the Glaspalast, also displayed at the 'Internationale Kunstausstellung Dresden', 1901 (and depicted in the exhibition catalogue), and again displayed at the ‘Ausstellung der Vereinigung für Angewandte Kunst‘, München, 1905. In ‘Kunst für Alle‘, 1917/18, we read that the fountain group had been moved to New York. It was bought by Samual Untermeyer who placed it in front of his mansion Greystone in New York. The bronze scupture is currently in the possession of the Hudson River Museum.

Below: the Greystone mansion, New York, in the first quater of the 20th century. At the left the Orpheus Fountain. 


Left: 'Orpheus' by Netzer, displayed at the ‘Ausstellung der Vereinigung für Angewandte Kunst‘, München, 1905.
Right: 'Orpeus Fountain' by Netzer, depected in 'Jugend', 1900.
 

The 'Orpheus Fountain', displayed at the 'Internationale Kunstausstellung Dresden', 1901. Depicted in the exhibition catalogue with the text: 'Orpheus, Brunnengruppe für Bronze und Kalkstein, Gips‘ ('Orpheus Fountain Figure, for bronze and limestone, plaster').



Hubert Netzer, 'Arion', Figur für einen Brunnen' ('Arion', Figure for a Fountain'). Depicted in 'Die Kunst im Deutschen 'Reich', 1939.


'Arion', cast in bronze. In the possession of the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen/ Neu Pinakothek. Size 152 x 86 x 58 cm.



Hubert Netzer, ‘Figur vom Kriegerdenkmal in Wesel‘ (‘Figur vor the War Memorial in the city of Wesel‘). Depicted in ‘Die Kunst im Deutschen Reich‘, 1939.


‘Kriegerdenkmal in Wesel‘, city-graveyard, Caspar-Baur-Strasse. Revealed in 1923. The memorial commemorated the fallen soldiers in WWI of the Wesel Garrison:
1. Königlich Preußisches Clevisches Feldartillerieregiment Nr. 43;
2. das 1. westfälische Feldartillerieregiment Nr. 7;
3. das Infanterieregiment Vogel von Falkenstein (7. Westfälisches) Nr. 56;
4. das Infanterieregiment Herzog Ferdinand von Braunschweig (8. Westfälisches) Nr.57.
The text at the back of the postcard (right) reads: ‘4. und 5. Juli 1925, Regimentsappell des Inf. Regt. Nr. 56 Vogel v. Falkenstein in der alten Garnisonstadt Wesel.
 


Hubert Netzer, column-sculpturs at the entrance of the ‘Ausstellung München 1908’, Theresienhöhe. Depicted in 'Dekorative Kunst', July 1908.


The two sculptures by Netzer: far right and far left.



Hubert Netzer, 'Der Genius des Friedens führt die beiden Württembergischen Wappentiere' ('Genius of Peace leading the two animals of the coat of arms of Württemberg'). Design which awarded in 1893 the first price for the König Karl-Olga Memorial in the city of Stuttgart. Depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1896/97.



Hubert Netzer, two portal-figures at Schloss Jägerhof, Düsseldorf. Created around 1911. The sculptures did survive the bombing of Juni 1943, but disappeared later. Depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1917/18.


Left: Hubert Netzer, Fountain in Düsseldorf (one of two), located in the Essener Strasse, in front of the schoolbuilding. Created in 1914. Destroyed in WWII. Photo taken around 1915.
Right: the remains of the fountain.
 


Hubert Netzer, ‘Lioness Fighting a Serpent’. Bronze. Sold by a German auction house in 2016. Bronze. Size 26 x 11 x 7,5 cm. Signed ‘HN’ on the plinth.




Hubert Netzer, 'Eve tempted by the Serpent'. Bronze, signed and dated ‘h. Netzer. 1896’. Size 64 x 20 cm. Sold in 2013 by Sotheby’s London.





'Bust of Hubert Netzer', depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1923/24 (by sculptor Charles Jaeckle, 1872 - 1923).







Hubert Netzer
Prominent sculptor, represented at all major exhibitions in Germany
Hubert Netzer (1865 - 1939), born in Isny (Allgäu), was the son of a gilder. His father died early, and he was further raised by his stepfather the sculptor and woodcarver Fidel Rudhart. Supported by a study grant from the city of Isny, Netzer went in 1890 to the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich, where he was a student of Adolf von Hildenbrand, Joahnnes Hoffart and Wilhelm von Rümann. Already during his study he was awarded several prices, including the Great Silver Medal by the Akademie der Bildende Künste in Munich in 1892; in 1893 Netzer created a design for the König Karl-Olga Memorial in the city of Stuttgart. His 'Der Genius des Friedens führt die beiden Württembergischen Wappentiere' ('Genius of Peace leading the two animals of the coat of arms of Württemberg') was awarded a Golden Medal and later depicted in 'Die Kunst für Alle', 1896/97.
In 1903 Netzer was granted the professor title. Beginning in 1911, Netzer had made a name for himself by designing a series of fountains in Munich, among others the Tritonbrunnen in 1893, the Narzissbrunnen in 1897, the Orpheusbrunnen in 1900, the Nornenbrunnen in 1907 and the Jonasbrunnen in 1910 (destroyed in WWII). 
Netzer’s Narzissbrunnnen was displayed in room 3 at the ‘VII. Internationalen Kunstausstellung im königlichen Glaspalast zu München‘, 1897; it was bought by the city of Munich and placed in the southwestern garden part of the Bavarian National Museum in Munich. Netzer created a second bronze cast of 'Narzissbrunnen' and displayed this one at the 'Berliner Kunstausstellung 1903'; this cast was bought by the German Kaiserin Auguste Viktoria (1858 - 1921) and placed in 1904 in the Rosengarten near the Neue Palais im Park Sanssouci, Potsdam. In 1976 the fountain was relocated to the courtyard of Cecilienhof Palace (UNESCO protected site in Potsdam). Apparently Netzer later created a third Narzissbrunnen in stone, placed in a courtyard of an unknown castle.
The ‘Orpheus Brunnen’ (‘Fountain of Orpheus’), was displayed in 1900 at the 'Münchener Jahres-Ausstellung 1900‘, in the Glaspalast, also displayed at the 'Internationale Kunstausstellung Dresden', 1901 (and depicted in the exhibition catalogue), and again displayed at the ‘Ausstellung der Vereinigung für Angewandte Kunst‘, München, 1905. It was bought by Samual Untermeyer who placed it -somewhere in the first decades of the 20th century- in front of his mansion ‘Greystone’ in New York; the bronze sculpture is currently in the possession of the Hudson River Museum.
From 1911 onwards, almost twenty years, Netzer taught at the ‘Dusseldorf School of Arts and Crafts’ (since 1919 the ‘Kunstakademie Dusseldorf’), but during this period he kept his atelier/house in the Marsopstrasse 16 in Pasing-Obermenzing (Munich). In the sculpture class under the direction of Wilhelm Kreis, he gave lessons in sculpture, painting in architecture. In 1931 he retired officially, and went back to Munich were he became Honourable Member of the Munich Academy of Art.

Other major works by Netzer, many of them depicted and described in ‘Die Kunst für Alle’, are:
The Prometheus-figure group on the gable of the central structure of the University of Würzburg, 1896.
The column-sculptures at the entrance of the ‘Ausstellung München 1908’, Theresienhöhe.
Commissioned by the city-priest in 1910, Dr. Michael Glaser, Netzer created for the Catholic Church in Neustadt four large statues of Medieval rulers and their wives (buried in that Church): Rudolf II, Ruprecht I, and Beatrix von Berg and Margarete von Sizilien-Aragon. Created in Kelheimer-limestone.
The two portal-figures at Schloss Jägerhof, Düsseldorf, created around 1911; the sculptures did survive the bombing of Juni 1943, but disappeared later.
Two fountains in 1914 in the Essener Strasse in Düsseldorf (in front of the schoolbuilding).
In 1921 Netzer’s 'Siegfried' War Memorial was erected on the Cemetery of Honor in Duisburg-Kaiserberg ('Denkmal Ehrenfriedhof für die Gefallenen des Ersten Weltkriegs). A year earlier, the memorial was displayed at the 'Grosse Kunstausstelling 1920', Düsseldorf.
In the same year, Netzer created ‘Sinnende Klio’, also named ‘Trauernde Muse’, or ‘Sorrowing Muse’, a figure for the grave of  mine director Hermann Brassert in Bonn; the sculpture was displayed at the 'Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung', 1918 in Düsseldorf.
In 1923 Netzer created six seated images of the virtues on the portico of the former country and district court building in Mühlenstraße in Düsseldorf-Altstadt ('Ehemaligen Amtsgericht').
Also from 1923 is the ‘Kriegerdenkmal in Wesel‘, city-graveyard, Caspar-Baur-Strasse. The memorial commemorated the fallen soldiers in WWI of the Wesel Garrison:
1. Königlich Preußisches Clevisches Feldartillerieregiment Nr. 43;
2. das 1. westfälische Feldartillerieregiment Nr. 7;
3. das Infanterieregiment Vogel von Falkenstein (7. Westfälisches) Nr. 56;
4. das Infanterieregiment Herzog Ferdinand von Braunschweig (8. Westfälisches) Nr.57.
In 1924/25 Netzer’s ‘Blitzeschleuderer’ (‘Donar’ or ‘Donnergott’, the Germanic God of Thunder, throwing lightning bolts) was cast. The sculpture is nowadays located in the roundabout on the Heinz-Ingenstau-Straße in Düsseldorf. Initially it was designed in 1911/1912 as 'Welttelegraphen Denkmal' (named 'Zeus') for the Helvetiaplatz in Berlin; it was re-designed in 1918 and displayed at the exhibition ‘Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung’, 1918.
In 1928, Netzer created the War Memorial in the Memorial Hall of the Ehrenfriedhof in the Schillerstraße in Duisburg-Homberg; in the wall the names are inscribed of all fallen civilians and soldiers from the village of Homburg during the wars of: 1864, 1866, 1870/71, 1914-1918 and 1939-1945.
‘Young Siegfried‘, or ‘Wehrfreiheitsdenkmal‘ was revealed at 15 May 1936; located at the Theatherplatz in Nordhausen. The memorial, destructed at 27 may 1945, 6 weeks after American troops concurred the village, was commissioned by the Nordhausen industrialist Otto Kruse. It was commemorating the remilitarization of the Rhineland by the German Army on 7 March 1936; although other sources say the memorial was commemorating the reintroduction of conscription in 1935.
'Rheintochter’ (‘Daughter of the Rhine’), commissioned in 1937 by the Reichspost Minister Dr. Ohnesorge. Executed in limestone, 2,2 meters high, and placed at the grounds of Neu Hakeburg (near Berlin).
Before 1939, Netzer created ‘Morpheus, the marblefigur for the family grave of the Nordhäuser industrialist Otto Kruse’; located on the Zentralfriedhof in Nordhäusen.

Hubert Netzer was a member of the Deutscher Kunstlerbund (Association of German Artists). Among his students were Arno Breker, Hans Meyers, Ernst Gottschalk, Curt Beckmann, Ferdinand Heseding and Willi Hoselmann.
In 1938 Netzer displayed 'Blitzeschleuderer' ('Miotacz Blyskawic') and ‘Morpheus' ('Morfeusz') at the 'Ausstellung Deutsche Bildhauer der Gegenwart' in Krakow, 1938.
At the Great German Art Exhibitions Netzer was represented in 1937 with the fountain figure ‘Rheintöchter’ ('Daughter of the River Rhine', in plaster, room 7), and in 1939 with the last work he created in his life, ‘Faustkämpfer’ (‘Boxer’, plaster, room 2). Faustkämpfer was depicted in 'Kunst dem Volk', 1939.
Netzer died in Munich in October 1939.
On the occasion of his death, the ‘Kunst im Deutschen Reich’ published in 1939 a special about Netzer in which seven of his art works were depicted, all in full page.  The city of Isny has named a street after Netzer.  
Various public works by Netzer are still existing, among them:
- the Narzissbrunnen in Munich and Potsdam;
- the bronze of the Orpheusbrunnen in New York (Hudson River Museum);
- the Nornenbrunnen in Munich;
- the Prometheus-figure group of the University of Würzburg;
- the four large statues in the Church of Neustad (Rudolf II, Ruprecht I, and their wives);
- the 'Siegfried' War Memorial in Duisburg-Kaiserberg;
- the ‘Sinnende Klio’ in Bonn;
- the six seated images of the former country and district court building in Düsseldorf-Altstadt;
- the ‘Blitzeschleuderer’ in Düsseldorf;
- the War Memorial in the Memorial Hall of the Ehrenfriedhof in Duisburg-Homberg;
- the ‘Morpheus, marblefigur for the family grave of the Nordhäuser industrialist Otto Kruse’;
- the bronze grave-figure 'Arion' in the Neu Pinakothek in Munich;
- 'Rheintochter’, still located at its original place, near the east entrance of the courtyard of Neu Hakeburg.