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Fritz Röll, Sandal Binder

Fritz Röll, Sandal Binder Fritz Röll, Sandal Binder Fritz Röll, Sandal Binder

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'Sandalenbinder' ('Sandal Binder')
Bronze, created in 1910.

In 1909 Fritz Röll was awarded the Great State Prize of the Prussian Academy of Art for his sculpture ‘Sandalenbinder’ (Sandal Binder): this was a life size plaster cast.
In 1910 a bronze cast (smaller than life size) was displayed at the Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung.
In 1911 a bronze cast of Sandalenbinder was again displayed at the Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung, however this time a life size cast was shown (height 140 cm). This cast was bought by Kaiser Wilhelm II.
In the same year another life size bronze cast was displayed in the Munich Glaspalast, at the 'Jubiläums- Ausstellung der Münchener Künstler-Genossenschaft, Zu Ehren des 90. Geburtstages Sr. Kgl. Hoheit des Prinz Regenten Luitpold von Bayern'.
Later, in 1943, again a smaller than life size bronze cast was displayed at the Grosse Deutsche Kunstausstellung. It was bought by the 'Gaumuseum für Kunsthandwerk in Danzig'. 
Between 1910 to 1914, when he stayed at the Villa Massimo German Academy in Rome, Fritz Röll created a life size (140 cm) Sandal Binder in marble, which was bought by Hitler in 1939 at the Great German Art Exhibition.
(source: descendant of Fritz Röll)


Fritz Röll, 'Sandalenbinder I', postcard. The text at the back of the card reads: 'Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung 1910'.



Fritz Röll, 'Sandelenbinder', bronze. GDK 1943 room 28. Bought for 1.500 Reichsmark by the Gaumuseum für Kunsthandwerk in Danzig.




- condition : II                    
- size : height 73,5 cm incl. base
- signed : at the foot 'F Röll 1910' 
- type : bronze. With foundry mark 'Guss Martin u. Piltzing/ Berlin' 





Frtz Röll, 'Sandalenbinder'. Marble, life size (height 140 cm). Created in Rome, 1910 - 1914. Displayed under the name 'Jünglingsfigur' ('Figure of Young Man'), GDK 1939 room 24. Bought by Hitler for 20.000 Reichsmark. Photo taken at the Day of German Art, 16 July 1939. From left to right: Joseph Goebbels, Italian Minister Dino Alfieri, Gerdi Troost and Hitler. 
This marble sculpture was also displayed at the exhibition 'Hundert Jahre Berliner Kunst', 1929 ('Im Schaffen des Vereins Berliner künstler'), organized by the Verein Berliner Künstler', Berlin.    
In 1945 the marble Sandal Binder was found in the Czech Republic, in the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Decennia later, in 2008, it showed up in London. It was offered for GBP 150,000 by the London art dealer Simon Wingett. Previously, Sotheby’s offered it in 2004, but the sculpture was withdrawn before the auction. Apparently the consigner of ‘Sandalenbinder’ was an art dealer in the Czech Republic.



‘Sandal Binder‘ by Fritz Röll at the GDK 1939, 16 July 1939. Left: Rudolf Hess.
The picture is from the documentary: Entartet! Die Nazis und die Kunst (at 0.54).



Photo taken on 11/12 July 1939 during a preliminary viewing of the GDK.
From left to right: Heinrich Hoffmann, Karl Kolbe (director HddK) and Hitler.


Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), Czech Republic
After 1942/43 several stolen art collections -and 46 paintings and 30 statues from Hitler’s private contemporary art collection- were hidden by the National Socialists in the Monastery of Hohenfurt (Vyssi Brod), near Linz in the Czech Republic. After the war, valuable art, such as pieces from the Mannheimer- and Rothschild collections, were confiscated by the U.S. Army and taken to the Munich Central Collection Point in an effort to return them to their original owners. Many less valuable works, like contemporary German Nazi-art works, were left behind after the 1945 liberation of Czechoslovakia and ended up scattered across the country.
The marble 'Sandalenbinder' by Fritz Röll was one of the 30 sculptures hided in the Monastery of Hohenfurt in 1945. Until the 1980s it was located in Schloß Lemberk/Nordböhmen, later brought to Liberec (Reichenberg) and then in 2004 it showed up at the auction of Sotheby in London.
In 2012 sixteen paintings by German artists -that Adolf Hitler personally purchased during WWII- were found in various Czech institutions. Seven were discovered in the Zákupy Chateau, the site where items from confiscated castles, chateaus and private houses were gathered after the war. Seven other canvases were found at the convent of Premonstratensian Sisters in Doksany, near Prague. Two paintings were found at the Military Institute in Prague and at the Faculty of Law of Charles University in Prague. All the sixteen paintings are now in the possession of the ‘Czech National Institute for the Protection and Conservation of Monuments and Sites’. They will remain in the Czech Republic.


Left: 'Sandalenbinder' by Roll. The marble sculpture was also displayed at the exhibition 'Hundert Jahre Berliner Kunst', 1929 ('Im Schaffen des Vereins Berliner Künstler'), organized by the Verein Berliner Künstler', Berlin.
Right: ‘Sandalenbinder‘, by Fritz Röll, marble, as it was found in 1945 in the Czech Republic, Monastery of Hohenfurt. Photo: 'Hitlerova Sbirka v Cechach', by Jiri Kuchar.
  



The original marble Sandalenbinder showed up in London in 2008. It was offered for GBP 150.000 by the London art dealer Simon Wingett. Previously Sotheby offered it in 2004, but the sculpture was withdrawn before the auction. Apparently the consigner of Sandalenbinder was an art dealer in the Czech Republic.




Left: Fritz Röll, 'Sandel Binder'. Displayed at the exhibition 'Ethos und Pathos', 1990, Staatliche Museen Preussicher Kulturbesitz. This bronze copy is in the possession of Museum Folkwang in Essen. Height 135 cm.
Right: ‘Sandelbinder‘, bronze, life size, located in Lietzenseepark, Berlin-Charlottenburg.
  



Hermann Göring Kaserne, Berlin / Julius Leber Kaserne
In 1936 construction works of a new barracks for the German Air Force started. The first finished buildings were occupied by the Luftwaffenregiment General Göring in 1937. The huge compound was named Hermann Göring Kaserne: in 1939 the construction works were finished including 120 buildings. The barracks were captured by soviet troops in May 1945, and taking over by the French later that year. It was badly damaged, only 20% of the buildings could be used. In 1994 the German Federal Army took over the compound and it was renamed to Julius Leber Kaserne. Today, the largest barracks of the German Bundeswehr in Berlin are under monument protection.

Left: The text on the facade of the staff-building of the Hermann Göring Kaserne reads: ‘Tapferkeit, Gehorsam, Ehre, Kameradschaft sind Grundlagen des Soldatentums‘ (‘Courage, Obedience, Honour, Comradeship are the fundamentals of a Soldier‘). The inscription was removed in 1994 (....).
Right: ‘Sandalenbinder‘ by Fritz Röll, located in the officers department of the Hermann Göring Kaserne. Life size (the life-size casts have a quadrangle base). 
Both photos are depicted in ‘Baugilde, Zeitschrift für die Deutschen Architekten‘, 1940, book 4/5. It is unclear wheater this is the same cast which is in the possession of the Folkwang Museum.
  



Nietzsche and Hitler
Fritz Röll,  'Bust of Nietzsche'. Photo taken at 12 April 1931 in the Nietzsche Haus in Weimar. Fritz Röll created the marble bust in 1921. Currently in the possession of the Goethe-Nationalmuseum, Weimar.




Left: Fritz Röll, 'Keuschheit und Schönheit' ('Chastity and Beauty'). Bronze. Created 1926.
Right: the bronze displayed under the name 'Keuschheit' at the GDK 1940 room 28.
  


Left: Fritz Röll, 'Läufer am Ziel' ('Runner at Finish'), 1926. Bronze. Since 1949 located in the city of Halle.
Middle: 'Läufer am Ziel', displayed at the GDK 1940 room 17 under the name 'Marathonläufer am Ziel'.
Right: 'Läufer am Ziel', depicted in 'Das Bild', 1934. 
     


Left: Fritz Röll, 'Schreitende' ('Walking'), 1932. Cast in 1936, bronze. Since 1962 located in Berlin.
Right: the same sculpture displayed at the GDK 1938 room 15, under the name 'Zum Start' ('At the Start'). A smaller copy was again displayed at the GDK 1941 room 28.
Below: 'Schreitende', the original plaster-model, depicted in 'Velhagen & Klasings Monatshefte', 1932/33.
  



Left: Fritz Röll, 'Steinmädchen' ('Stone-girl'), 1913. Muschelkalk. Since 1962 located in Berlin.
Right: 'Steinmädchen', displayed at the GDK 1937 room 19.
  


Fritz Röll, 'Verzweifelte' ('Desparation'), 1912. Bronze. Since 1962 located in Berlin.



Left: Fritz Röll, 'Adam', bronze, 1926. Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 38.
Right: Fritz Röll, 'Eva', bronze, 1926. Displayed at the GDK 1937 room 38.
   


Fritz Röll, 'Mutter Erde mit gefallenem' ('Mother-earth with fallen Son'). Grave of Ernst Keilplug, 1895-1918. War Memorial, Luisenfriedhof, Berlin.




Bronze casting in Germany
After the Liberation Wars (1813–1815) sculpting in Germany was focussed on the creation of public memorials, monumental horse riders, life-size statues and bust-memorials. Huge persons placed on a base were individual examples of great achievements, functioning for collective identification purposes. Christian Daniel Rauch can be mentioned here as one of the most influential sculptors in the 19th century in Germany.  
From 1890 onwards, the theme and form of sculptures changed, in line with a change in the type of commissioners. Until then, the state had been the major commissioner of statues, but increasingly the up-and-coming group of industrialists and rich civilians were asking for smaller statues which could be placed in their salons. Sculptors suddenly had to deal with their own artistic views and a demand from a broad commercial market. Demand for monumental horse rider statues declined, while statues like 'Sieger' and 'Amazone' came into fashion along with mythical-inspired figures like ' Venus und Amor', 'Bogensschuetze' and 'Sandalenbinder'. After World War I, German foundries started to take over original models from sculptors, or started in cooperation with artists to produce bronzes in larger series on commission. Foundries like Lauchhammer published catalogues from which clients could choose a sculpture in different sizes. Overall this did not really lead to mass production; however, the number of casts could vary substantially per artist (larger series are known by Cirrilo dell’Antonio, Friedrich Moritz Brodauf , Emil Cauer, Eberhard Encke , Gerhard Janensch, Ferdinand Lepcke, Heinrich Moshage). After World War II, sculptures often were produced in much larger series of 100, 500 or even 1000; mostly they were given numbers, which did not frequently happen before that time.
The works by Ritz Röll were made in very limited editions.




Fritz Röll
Fritz Röll (1897–1956), born in Kaltennordheim, went to the Kunstgewerbeschule in Neuremberg from 1896 to 1900. Afterwards he worked for a year and a half as an assistant in the ateliers of Gustav Eberlein and Johannes Götz in Berlin. From 1902 to 1910, Röll attended the Art Academy in Berlin, studying under Ernst Herter, Peter Breuer and, most of the time, under Gerhard Janensch. In 1909 Fritz Röll was awarded the Great State Prize of the Prussian Academy of Art for his sculpture ‘Sandalenbinder’ ('Sandal Binder', a life size plaster model). In 1910 a bronze cast (smaller than life size) was displayed at the Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung. In 1911 a bronze cast of Sandalenbinder was again displayed at the Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellung, however this time a life size cast was shown (height 140 cm): this cast was bought by Kaiser Wilhelm II. In the same year another life size bronze cast was displayed in the Glaspalast in Munich.
From 1910 to 1914 Fritz Röll stayed in Rome and in 1912 he moved to the Villa Massimo German Academy (for five months together with Adolf von Hildebrand). During this period he created the life size (140 cm) Sandal Binder in marble, which was later bought by Hitler at the Great German Art Exhibition (this sculpture was also displayed at the exhibition 'Ausstellung des Vereins Berliner Künstler', 1929).
After Röll served in WWI, he went to Berlin-Dahlem where he opened his own atelier in 1919 (in 1935 he took over the atelier of August Gaul). In 1928 he was awarded the Silver Medal for German Art in Düsseldorf and he later received the Menzelpreis. Röll, who worked in stone, bronze and wood, belonged to the Berliner Bildhauerschule. His works were displayed at numerous exhibitions in Bratislava, Berlin (Grosse Berliner Kunstausstellungen 1901 –1942), Dusseldorf, Essen, Helsinki, Koningsberg, Munich (1904 –1941), Rome, Vienna and Warsaw.
In 1934 Röll was in charge of leading the Grosse Berliner Kunsausstellung. His style, which was significantly influenced by Adolf von Hildebrand, was appreciated by the National Socialists.
At the Great German Art Exhibitions in Munich, Röll was represented with 17 works, including ‘Schreitende’, 'Keuschheit' 'Läufer am Ziel’ and 'Adam und Eva'. Hitler bought the famous marble 'Sandal Binder' (also named ‘Younglingsfigur’ or ‘Youth figure') for 20,000 Reichsmarks at the GDK 1939 room 24. Later, in 1943, a smaller than life size bronze cast was again displayed at the GDK; it was bought by the 'Gaumuseum für Kunsthandwerk in Danzig'. 
In 1943 Röll fled, ill, to his birthplace of Kaltennordheim, which after 1945 became occupied territory by the Russians.
Fritz Röll died in 1956 in Kaltennordheim.
A bronze Sandalenbinder owned by the Folkwang-Museum in Essen was displayed in 1990 at the exhibition ‘Ethos und Pathos’, Staatlichen Museen Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin. Other still existing sculptures by Röll include:
- ‘Sandalenbinder', life size, bronze, since 1962 located in Berlin;
- 'Verzweifelter’ (‘Desperation’), 1912, since 1962 located in Berlin;
- ‘Steinmädchen’ (‘Stone-girl’), 1913, since 1962 located in Berlin;
- ‘Schreitende’ (‘Walking’), 1932, since 1962 located in Berlin.
All four bronze statues were bequeathed by the heirs of Fritz Röll in 1962 to the city of Berlin. Other existing sculptures: ‘Läufer am Ziel’ (‘Runners at Finish’, 1926, since 1949 in the city of Halle), a war memorial in Kaltennordheim and the marble Nietzsche bust (1921) in the Goethe-Nationalmuseum in Weimar.
In 1945 the marble Sandal Binder, previously owned by Hitler, was found in the Czech Republic, in the Monastery of Hohenfurt. Decennia later, in 2008, it showed up in London. It was offered for GBP 150,000 by the London art dealer Simon Wingett. Previously, Sotheby’s offered it in 2004, but the sculpture was withdrawn before the auction. Apparently the consigner of ‘Sandalenbinder’ was an art dealer in the Czech Republic.